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LinkedIn









EXAMPLE 1:

Accusations have been abound for years that LinkedIn was hacked and all the information has been stolen.  Problem is no one has substantiated it.

Part of the likely reason is that (a) people like to tell shocking stories, (b) people can be easily persuaded through simple deception.   A member received a LinkedIn Reminder to contact someone but it never reveals to whom, building your urge to "CLICK THE LINK".

In the screen shot below, with our member's e-mail address blocked out, you can detect their act quickly:
  1.  LinkedIn is not spelled Linked In ... a mistaken often made except when work at
       LinkedIn.
  2.  When placing your cursor on the link you discover it is NOT going to LinkedIn but
       to a server registered to an organization in Ferrera, Italy.  Also listed: names,
       street addresses, state, Postal Code and phone numbers of the site
       registrants/owners.

Network Solutions is a respected company who has been involved with Domain Name Registrations for a long time.  The offer an on-line free tool at http://www.networksolutions.com/domain-name-registration/index.jsp allowing you to simply enter the URL of the offending site to see what they have on file.

Don't let the Bad Guys fool you!  Be safe, not sorry.




EXAMPLE 2:  Bogus LinkedIn Member Message

Another phishing attack
creates the impression you received a message from an unidentified LinkedIn User (yet the e-mail suggests it is from a person by name and e-mail address which is often bogus).

The message indicates it was sent to "Undisclosed recipients:" in a very plain e-mail lacking some of the items you would normally expect to see ,,, which is a potential warning flag.

The e-mail text simply reads "Dear LinkedIn user you have pending message click Here http://liinkedi.weebly.com/ to read.

There is nothing else in the e-mail.  PLEASE DO NOT TRY THIS LINK.

So here are the clear warning signs:

  1. It is sent to multiple people suggesting either SPAM or a phishing attack to get you.

  2. a)  The text is vague,
    b)  the selection of English words is highly questionable coming from a large
         company like LinkedIn,
    c)  there is no period after the word "click" and before the word "Here"
    d)  the link has LinkedIn misspelled with two lower case "i's" after the letter "L"
         and is 
    lacking the final letter "n" (a trick often used by the bad guys),
    e)  WHAT company would allow such communication to be sent to anyone?
         NONE!
    f)   By the way the link is crafted it is going to a web site of weebly.com then to
         a server at this site designated liinkedi  
    Don't let yourself be fooled!

  3. If this were from LinkedIn would you expect to see a good crisp LinkedIn logo included?  Some Bad Guys will use distorted logos but good crisp ones are easily found on the Internet.


EXAMPLE 3:  LinkedIn Account Locked

      linkedIn Security <member.alert.services@xxxxxxx.xxx>

      [Bulk]  Verification Required

      To:

      [a "copy" of the LinkedIn logo appears here]

      Dear User,

      We have Locked****** your account. Manual verification is required.

      
  ·    [Activate Now]



So here are the clear warning signs:

  1. Notice the mail is from "linkedIn Security" not "LinkedIn Security".

  2. The e-mail address is not from the domain of "linkedin.com"
    Why would they not use their own e-mail domain to send messages?

  3. [Bulk] Verification Required
    A warning that this e-mail was "mass mailed" to many ...
    why mass mailed
    with a link to unlock a personal account?

  4. A LinkedIn logo is included in the e-mail.
    Want to guess
    how many images of the LinkedIn logo can be found on Google?

  5. Dear User,
    They know who I am, know my account is locked, provide a link to unlock my
    account yet
    I am "Dear User" to them?   Yes, definitely [Bulk] mailed!  

  6. "Activate Now" Link
    In this one case, by positioning your mouse over the link I found the link went to:
    http://campbell-eyecare.co.uk/form.page/************.htm   It appears to be a legitimate business yet it is providing an unlock tool for a personal LinkedIn account?  Many companies have lackluster security allowing hackers to create and control illegitimate web pages on a legitimate web site to create the image the link is legitimate.  So do you try the link?  DO NOT.  Instead visit the legitimate web page and stop before the first slash.  Notify the web site owner of a potential hack.
    If you try the link in the reproduced e-mail message above, you will be redirected to "The Bad Guys" page within this web site as a reminder to be careful what you click.








  7. a)  The text is vague,
    b)  the selection of English words is highly questionable coming from a large
         company like LinkedIn,
    c)  there is no period after the word "click" and before the word "Here"
    d)  the link has LinkedIn spelled with two lower case "i's" after the letter "L" and is
         lacking the final letter "n",
    e)  WHAT company would allow such communication to be sent to anyone?
         NONE!

  8. If this were from LinkedIn would you expect to see a good crisp LinkedIn logo included?  Some Bad Guys will use distorted logos but good crisp ones are easily found on the Internet.