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TED Videos

290 Videos                                                                                                                                                                   Updated: 06/18/2017

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What is TED?

   TED is a nonpartisan nonprofit devoted to spreading
   ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks. TED
   began in 1984 as a conference where Technology,
   Entertainment and Design converged, and today covers
   almost all topics - from science to business to global
   issues - in more than 110 languages.  Independently run TEDx events help share
   ideas in communities around the world.  If you can get an official TED event ticket, 
   most are $5,000 US Dollars.  We hope you benefit from the videos at your leisure!



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TED: Why we Shouldn't Trust Markets with Our Civic Life (14:37)
In the past three decades, says Michael Sandelthe US has drifted from a market economy to a market society; it's fair to say that an American's experience of shared civic life depends on how much money they have. (Three key examples: access to education, access to justice, political influence.) In a talk and audience discussion, Sandel asks us to think honestly on this question: In our current democracy, is too much for sale?



Believing
A Life of Purpose (21:02)                                                                                                                    09/13/2016
Pastor Rick Warren, author of "The Purpose-Driven Life," reflects on his own crisis of purpose in the wake of his book's wild success.  He explains his belief that God's intention is for each of us to use our talents and influence to do good.
Allan Pease is an Honorary Professor of Psychology at ULIM International University, who researches and studies selling relationships and human communication. He teaches simple, field-tested skills and techniques that get results. And he delivers his message in a humorous way, which motivates people to want to use. Allan's own experience and record in the field of selling, motivating and training is equaled by few others. He is a born achiever, starting his career at the age of 10. Globally known as "Mr Body Language", his programs are used by businesses and governments to teach powerful relationship skills. His messages are relevant to any area of life that involves winning people over and getting them to like you, co-operate, follow you or say 'yes'.

Do What you Love ... NO EXCUSES! (15:26) [LANGUAGE]                                          09/03/2016
At the Web 2.0 Expo, entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk gives a shot in the arm to dreamers and up-and-comers who face self-doubt. The Internet has made the formula for success simpler than ever, he argues. So there's now no excuse not to do what makes you happy.

Jim Cathcart thought he would never make a difference. An average student from a working class family with no athletic or special skills, he expected an unremarkable existence. But one radio message in 1972 changed the direction of his life & authored his belief in his potential. Today, he's a Hall of Fame Speaker, and has authored 16 books. While changing himself, Jim also discovered how to help others believe in themselves, too. 

It's time to reclaim and reinvent religion (16:27)                                                         12/22/2016
At a moment when the world seems to be spinning out of control, religion might feel irrelevant — or like part of the problem. But Rabbi Sharon Brous believes we can reinvent religion to meet the needs of modern life. In this impassioned talk, Brous shares four principles of a revitalized religious practice and offers faith of all kinds as a hopeful counter-narrative to the numbing realities of violence, extremism and pessimism.

On Technology and Faith (26:16)                                                                                               09/13/2016
Speaking at TED in 1998, Rev. Billy Graham marvels at technology's power to improve lives and change the world — but says the end of evil, suffering and death will come only after the world accepts Christ.  A legendary talk from TED's archives.

 
 
GROUPS OF CAREER TRANSITION RELATED TOPICS

 
 
Architecture
Buildings that Blend Nature and City (11:55)                                                                 01/25/2017
A skyscraper that channels the breeze ... a building that creates community around a hearth ... Jeanne Gang uses architecture to build relationships. In this engaging tour of her work, Gang invites us into buildings large and small, from a surprising local community center to a landmark Chicago skyscraper. "Through architecture, we can do much more than create buildings," she says. "We can help steady this planet we all share."


Behavior
Beware Online "Filter Bubbles" (9:04)
As web companies strive to tailor their services (including news and search results) to your personal tastes, there is a dangerous unintended consequence: We get trapped in a "filter bubble" and don't get exposed to information that could challenge or broaden our worldview.|
Eli Pariser
argues powerfully that this will ultimately prove to be bad for us and bad for democracy.

Don't Eat the Marshmallow
 
(5:58) 
Joachim de Posada shares a landmark experiment on delayed gratification — and how it can predict future success.  With priceless video of kids trying their hardest not to eat the marshmallow.

Got a wicked problem, first tell me how you make toa
st 
(9:01)
Making toast doesn’t sound very complicated — until someone asks you to draw the process, step by step.  Tom Wujec loves asking people and teams to draw how they make toast, because the process reveals unexpected truths about how we can solve our biggest, most complicated problems at work.  Learn how to run this exercise yourself, and hear Wujec’s surprising insights from watching thousands of people draw toast.

Inside the Mind of a Master Procrastinator (14:03)
Tim Urban knows that procrastination doesn't make sense, but he's never been able to shake his habit of waiting until the last minute to get things done. In this hilarious and insightful talk, Urban takes us on a journey through YouTube binges, Wikipedia rabbit holes and bouts of staring out the window — and encourages us to think harder about what we're really procrastinating on, before we run out of time.

What Your Data Reveals About You 
(20:38)                                                                       10/08/2016
Does what you share online reveal more than you think?  Discover what your personal data says about you with these insightful talks with reporter Glenn Greenwald.

Why We Need Strangeness (8:00)
In our digital world, social relations have become mediated by data. Without even realizing it, we're barricading ourselves against strangeness — people and ideas that don't fit the patterns of who we already know, what we already like and where we've already been.  Maria Bezaitis makes a bold call for technology to deliver us to what and who we need, even if it's unfamiliar and strange.

  
Career Break / Careers
How to get back to work after a career break (12:01)
If you've taken a career break and are now looking to return to the workforce, would you consider taking an internship? Career reentry expert Carol Fishman Cohen thinks you should.
In this talk, hear about Cohen's own experience returning to work after a career break, her work championing the success of "relaunchers" and how employers are changing how they engage with return-to-work talent.


The Career Advice You Probably Didn't Get (13:57)
You’re doing everything right at work, taking all the right advice, but you’re just not moving up.  Why?  Susan Colantuono shares a simple, surprising piece of advice you might not have heard before quite so plainly.  This talk, while aimed at an audience of women, has universal takeaways — for men and women, new grads and midcareer workers.

The Power of Time Off (17:40)
Every seven years, designer Stefan Sagmeister closes his New York studio for a yearlong sabbatical to rejuvenate and refresh their creative outlook. He explains the often overlooked value of time off and shows the innovative projects inspired by his time in Bali.
  
Why Some of Us Don't Have One True Calling (12:26)
What do you want to be when you grow up? Well, if you're not sure you want to do just one thing for the rest of your life, you're not alone. In this illuminating talk, writer and artist Emilie Wapnick describes the kind of people she calls "multipotentialites" — who have a range of interests and jobs over one lifetime. Are you one?  Emilie Wapnick presents.

Why You Should Know now much Your Coworkers Get Paid? (7:29)         09/20/2016
How much do you get paid?  How does it compare to the people you work with?  You should know, and so should they, says management researcher David Burkus.  In this talk, Burkus questions our cultural assumptions around keeping salaries secret and makes a compelling case for why sharing them could benefit employees, organizations and society.


Caring

How to Get Better at Things You Care About (11:22)                                              02/03/2017
Working hard but not improving? You're not alone. Eduardo Briceño reveals a simple way to think about getting better at the things you do, whether that's work, parenting or creative hobbies. And he shares some useful techniques so you can keep learning and always feel like you're moving forward.

Why Some People are More Altruistic than Others (12:21)                                  2016/09/18

Why do some people do selfless things, helping other people even at risk to their own well-being?  Psychology researcher Abigail Marsh studies the motivations of people who do extremely altruistic acts, like donating a kidney to a complete stranger. Are their brains just different?


Challenges
Looking Past Limits (19:12)                                                                                                            10/15/2016
Activist Caroline Casey tells the story of her extraordinary life, starting with a revelation (no spoilers). In a talk that challenges perceptions, Casey asks us all to move beyond the limits we may think we have.


Change
5 Ways to Lead in an Era of Consistent Change (13:21)                                         10/13/2016
Who says change needs to be hard? Organizational change expert Jim Hemerling thinks adapting your business in today's constantly-evolving world can be invigorating instead of exhausting. He outlines five imperatives, centered around putting people first, for turning company reorganization into an empowering, energizing task for all.

How to Tie Your Shoes (2:59)                                                                                09/13/2016
Terry Moore found out he'd been tying his shoes the wrong way his whole life. In the spirit of TED, he takes the stage to share a better way. (Historical note: This was the very first 3-minute audience talk given from the TED stage, in 2005.)

The Tribes We Lead (17:29)                                                                                                              09/09/2016
Seth Godin argues the Internet has ended mass marketing and revived a human social unit from the distant past: tribes.  Founded on shared ideas and values, tribes give ordinary people the power to lead and make big change.  He urges us to do so.


Choosing
How to make choosing easier (16:04)                                                                                     11/00/2011
We all want customized experiences and products — but when faced with 700 options, consumers freeze up. With fascinating new research, psycho-economist Sheena Iyengar demonstrates how businesses (and others) can improve the experience of choosing. 

  
Collaboration
Let's Work Together (14:14)
Conservatives and liberals both believe that they alone are motivated by love while their opponents are motivated by hate. How can we solve problems with so much polarization? In this talk, social scientist Arthur Brooks shares ideas for what we can each do as individuals to break the gridlock. "We might just be able to take the ghastly holy war of ideology that we're suffering under and turn it into a competition of ideas," he says.

The New Power of Collaboration (19:31)                                                                             09/09/2016
Howard Rheingold talks about the coming world of collaboration, participatory media and collective action -- and how Wikipedia is really an outgrowth of our natural human instinct to work as a group.
 
 
Communications
"We mustn't speak to strangers." Malavika Varadan, challenges this societal norm, by presenting 7 ways to make conversation with anyone.

How Do You Define Yourself (13:10)
In a time when beauty is defined by supermodels, success is defined by wealth, and fame is deified by how many followers you have on social media, Lizzie Velasquez asks the question how do you define yourself?  Once labeled, "The Worlds Ugliest Woman," Lizzie decided to turn things around and create her own definitions of what she defines as beauty and happiness. 
 
Magicians have mastered the art of understanding different perspectives in order to create illusions and connect with the audience.  Brian Miller explains how he used that skill to create magic for a blind man.  Then he shares how you can use the same technique to make better, more meaningful connections with people in your life personally and professionally.  Brian Miller is a private event magician, corporate keynote speaker, and youth motivational speaker. 
 
Kalina Silverman wanted to see what could happen if she approached strangers and skipped the small talk to have more meaningful conversations with them instead.  She made a video documenting the experience.  The stories she heard and the connections she made proved that there's power in taking the time to stop and ask people to reflect on the questions that truly matter in life.
 
Nancy Duarte Uncovers Common Structure of Greatest Communicators (18:11)
Why are some presentations spellbinding and some not? Well, this is the question Nancy Duarte takes on as she shares with the audience the secret of an excellent presentation. In this fascinating talk Nancy Duarte explains the model that she developed for designing transformative presentations. She explains the essential qualities of an excellent presentation by analyzing the speeches of Martin Luther King and Steve Jobs. She reminds us that the only way to spread important ideas is to make sure that one is communicating his or her ideas effectively using strong presentation skills. 

Shh!  Sound Health in 8 Steps (7:11)
Julian Treasure says our increasingly noisy world is gnawing away at our mental health -- even costing lives. He lays out an 8-step plan to soften this sonic assault (starting with those cheap earbuds) and restore our relationship with sound.

There's no single formula for a great talk, but there is a secret ingredient that all the best ones have in common. TED Curator Chris Anderson shares this secret — along with four ways to make it work for you. Do you have what it takes to share an idea worth spreading?
Danielle Feinberg, Pixar's director of photography, creates stories with soul and wonder using math, science and code.  Go behind the scenes of Finding Nemo, Toy Story, Brave, WALL-E and more, and discover how Pixar interweaves art and science to create fantastic worlds where the things you imagine can become real.  This talk comes from the PBS special "TED Talks: Science & Wonder."

Dr. Chris Shea works in non verbal strategy analysis for groups and individuals including analyses and skills training in non verbal communication.


The Secret Structure to Great Talks (18:11)                  From the "I have a dream" speech to Steve Jobs’ iPhone launch, many great talks have a common structure that helps their message resonate with listeners. In this talk, presentation expert Nancy Duarte shares practical lessons on how to make a powerful call-to-action.
Click on image to enlarge it.
         There's no single formula for a great talk, but there is a secret ingredient that all the best
         ones have in common.  TED Curator
Chris Anderson shares this secret -- along with four
         ways to make it work for you. Do you have what it takes to share an idea worth spreading? 
 
         The Surprising Secret to Speaking with Confidence (18:55) 
         In this fun and personal talk, Caroline Goyder shares a story of moving from stage-paralysis
         to expressive self.  Accompanied by an unusual prop, she encourages us to use our voice as
         an instrument and really find the confidence within. 

 
Want to sound like a leader?  Start by saying your name right (15:32)
How we use language - our accent, expressions, and the structure of our sentences - changes from region to region. Vera Regan explains why we should listen to these differences, and why language can act as a cultural barometer.
 
What your speaking style, like, says about you (15:46)
How we use language - our accent, expressions, and the structure of our sentences - changes from region to region. Vera Regan explains why we should listen to these differences, and why language can act as a cultural barometer. 
  

Confidence     
How to Build Your Creative Confidence (11:46)                                                            12/21/2016
Is your school or workplace divided into "creatives" versus practical people? Yet surely, David Kelley suggests, creativity is not the domain of only a chosen few.  Telling stories from his legendary design career and his own life, he offers ways to build the confidence to create... (From The Design Studio session at TED2012, guest-curated by Chee Pearlman and David Rockwell.)

The Skill of Self Confidence (13:20)
As the Athletic Director and head coach of the Varsity Soccer team at Ryerson University, Dr. Joseph is often asked what skills he is searching for as a recruiter: is it speed? Strength? Agility? In Dr. Joseph's TEDx Talk, he explores self confidence and how it is not just the most important skill in athletics, but in our lives.


Consumption
The Case for Collaborative Consumption (16:34)                                                        10/17/2016
In her talk, Rachel Botsman says we're "wired to share" — and shows how websites like Zipcar and Swaptree are changing the rules of human behavior.


Courage
5 Ways to Kill Your Dreams (6:11)
All of us want to invent that game-changing product, launch that successful company, write that best-selling book. And yet so few of us actually do it.  TED Fellow and Brazilian entrepreneur Bel Pesce breaks down five easy-to-believe myths that ensure your dream projects will never come to fruition.
 
A Life Lesson from a Volunteer Fireman (4:07)
Volunteer firefighter Mark Bezos tells a story of an act of heroism that didn't go quite as expected — but that taught him a big lesson: Don't wait to be a hero.
  
Dare to Disagree (12:56)
Most people instinctively avoid conflict, but as Margaret Heffernan shows us, good disagreement is central to progress.  She illustrates (sometimes counter-intuitively) how the best partners aren’t echo chambers — and how great research teams, relationships and businesses allow people to deeply disagree.

How the Worst Moments in our Lives make us Who we Are (20:23)
Writer Andrew Solomon has spent his career telling stories of the hardships of others. Now he turns inward, bringing us into a childhood of adversity, while also spinning tales of the courageous people he's met in the years since. In a moving, heartfelt and at times downright funny talk, Solomon gives a powerful call to action to forge meaning from our biggest struggles.
  
How to make hard choices (14:41)
Here's a talk that could literally change your life.  Which career should I pursue? Should I break up — or get married?!  Where should I live? Big decisions like these can be agonizingly difficult. But that's because we think about them the wrong way, says philosopher Ruth Chang.  She offers a powerful new framework for shaping who we truly are.
  
Interview with Sir Richard Branson: Live at 30,000 feet (29:47)
Richard Branson talks to TED's Chris Anderson about the ups and the downs of his career, from his multibillionaire success to his multiple near-death experiences — and reveals some of his (very surprising) motivations.
  
Listening to Shame (20:38)
Shame is an unspoken epidemic, the secret behind many forms of broken behavior.  Brené Brown, whose earlier talk on vulnerability became a viral hit, explores what can happen when people confront their shame head-on.  Her own humor, humanity and vulnerability shine through every word.
  
Looking Past Limits (19:17)                                                                                                              10/16/2016
Activist Caroline Casey tells the story of her extraordinary life, starting with a revelation (no spoilers). In a talk that challenges perceptions, Casey asks us all to move beyond the limits we may think we have.

Never, Ever Give Up
(15:35)
In the pitch-black night, stung by jellyfish, choking on salt water, singing to herself, hallucinating … Diana Nyad just kept on swimming.  And that's how she finally achieved her lifetime goal as an athlete: an extreme 100-mile swim from Cuba to Florida — at age 64. Hear her story.
   
Should You Live for Your Resume ... or Your Eulogy (5:01)
Within each of us are two selves, suggests David Brooks (NBC News Correspondent) in this meditative short talk: the self who craves success, who builds a résumé, and the self who seeks connection, community, love — the values that make for a great eulogy.  (Joseph Soloveitchik has called these selves "Adam I" and "Adam II.")  Brooks asks: Can we balance these two selves?
  
The Beauty of being a Misfit (12:58) [LANGUAGE]
To those who feel like they don't belong: there is beauty in being a misfit.  Author Lidia Yuknavitch shares her own wayward journey in an intimate recollection of patchwork stories about loss, chare and the slow process of self-acceptance.  "Even at the moment of your failure, you are beautiful." she says.  "You don't know it yet, but you have the ability to reinvent yourself endlessly.  That's your beauty."

The Paradox of Choice (19:37)                                                                                                      09/13/2016
Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz's estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied.

The Power of Believing that YOU Can Improve (10:20)
Carol Dweck researches “growth mindset” — the idea that we can grow our brain's capacity to learn and to solve problems.  In this talk, she describes two ways to think about a problem that’s slightly too hard for you to solve.  Are you not smart enough to solve it … or have you just not solved it yet?  A great introduction to this influential field.
  
The Puzzle of Motivation (18:32)
Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don't: Traditional rewards aren't always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories — and maybe, a way forward.
 
The Three "A"s of Awesome (17:33)
Neil Pasricha's blog 1000 Awesome Things savors life's simple pleasures, from free refills to clean sheets.  In this heartfelt talk, he reveals the 3 secrets (all starting with A) to leading a life that's truly awesome.

This is What Happens When You Respond to Spam e-Mail (9:48)
Suspicious emails: unclaimed insurance bonds, diamond-encrusted safe deposit boxes, close friends marooned in a foreign country. They pop up in our inboxes, and standard procedure is to delete on sight. But what happens when you reply? Follow along as writer and comedian James Veitch narrates a hilarious, weeks-long exchange with a spammer who offered to cut him in on a hot deal.  NOTE:  It is still NOT RECOMMEND you respond to spam e-mails. 
 
Want to be happy?  Be grateful (14:30)
The one thing all humans have in common is that each of us wants to be happy, says Brother David Steindle-Rast, a monk and interfaith scholar.  And happiness, he suggests, is born from gratitude. An inspiring lesson in slowing down, looking where you’re going, and above all, being grateful.
   
We're all hiding something.  Let's find the courage to open up (9:22)
In this touching talk, Ash Beckham offers a fresh approach to empathy and openness.  It starts with understanding that everyone, at some point in their life, has experienced hardship. The only way out, says Beckham, is to open the door and step out of your closet.
 
 
Creativity & Play
Tales of Creativity and Play (27:58)                                                                                           10/28/2016
At the 2008 Serious Play conference, designer Tim Brown talks about the powerful relationship between creative thinking and play — with many examples you can try at home (and one that maybe you shouldn't).



Cyber Security
All Your Devices Can Be Hacked (16:56)                                                                              01/27/2017
Could someone hack your pacemaker? Avi Rubin shows how hackers are compromising cars, smartphones and medical devices, and warns us about the dangers of an increasingly hack-able world.

Cracking Stuxnet, a 21st Century Cyber Weapon (10:40)                                   01/27/2017
When first discovered in 2010, the Stuxnet computer worm posed a baffling puzzle. Beyond its sophistication loomed a more troubling mystery: its purpose. Ralph Langner and team helped crack the code that revealed this digital warhead's final target. In a fascinating look inside cyber-forensics, he explains how — and makes a bold (and, it turns out, correct) guess at its shocking origins.

Fighting Viruses, Defending the Net (17:34)
It's been 25 years since the first PC virus (Brain A) hit the net, and what was once an annoyance has become a sophisticated tool for crime and espionage.  Computer security expert Mikko Hyppönen tells us how we can stop these new viruses from threatening the internet as we know it.
 
Hackers: The Internet's Immune System (16:39)
The beauty of hackers, says cybersecurity expert Keren Elazari, is that they force us to evolve and improve.  Yes, some hackers are bad guys, but many are working to fight government corruption and advocate for our rights.  By exposing vulnerabilities, they push the Internet to become stronger and healthier, wielding their power to create a better world.

Hire the Hackers! (18:39)                                                                                                                   01/27/2017
Despite multibillion-dollar investments in cybersecurity, one of its root problems has been largely ignored: who are the people who write malicious code? Underworld investigator Misha Glenny profiles several convicted coders from around the world and reaches a startling conclusion.

How Cyberattacks Threaten real-world Peace (9:24)                                               01/27/2017
Nations can now attack other nations with cyber weapons: silent strikes on another country's computer systems, power grids, dams that leave no trace behind. (Think of the Stuxnet worm.) Guy-Philippe Goldstein shows how cyberattacks can leap between the digital and physical worlds to prompt armed conflict — and how we might avert this global security hazard.

How (and why) Russia hacked the US election (9:33)                                               04/00/2017
Hacking, fake news, information bubbles ... all these and more have become part of the vernacular in recent years. But as cyberspace analyst Laura Galante describes in this alarming talk, the real target of anyone looking to influence geopolitics is dastardly simple: it's you.


How I Hacked Online Dating (17:27)                                                                                       01/27/2017
Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating. The dates she liked didn't write her back, and her own profile attracted crickets (and worse). So, as any fan of data would do: she started making a spreadsheet. Hear the story of how she went on to hack her online dating life — with frustrating, funny and life-changing results.

How to Fool a GPS (15:45)                                                                                                                 01/27/2017
Todd Humphreys forecasts the near-future of geolocation when millimeter-accurate GPS "dots" will enable you to find pin-point locations, index-search your physical possessions ... or to track people without their knowledge. And the response to the sinister side of this technology may have unintended consequences of its own.

Todd Humphreys is director of the University of Texas at Austin's Radionavigation Laboratory -- where he works as an assistant professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. His research into orbital mechanics has made him one of the world's leading experts on GPS technology and the security concerns that arise from its ubiquitous use.  In 2008 he co-founded Coherent Navigation, a startup dedicated to creating more secure GPS systems.

Three Types of Online Attacks (9:23)                                                                                     01/27/2017
Cybercrime expert Mikko Hypponen talks us through three types of online attack on our privacy and data — and only two are considered crimes. "Do we blindly trust any future government? Because any right we give away, we give away for good."

Why Good Hackers make Good Citizens (9:50)                                                             01/27/2017
Hacking is about more than mischief-making or political subversion. As Catherine Bracy describes in this spirited talk, it can be just as much a force for good as it is for evil. She spins through some inspiring civically-minded projects in Honolulu, Oakland and Mexico City — and makes a compelling case that we all have what it takes to get involved.
  

Do Good
My Journey Into Movies that Matter (15:31)                                                                       02/21/2017
Film producer Jeff Skoll (An Inconvenient Truth) talks about his film company, Participant Productions, and the people who've inspired him to do good.


Emotions
       5 Ways to Kill Your Dreams 
(6:11)                                                                                            10/22/2016
All of us want to invent that game-changing product, launch that successful company, write that best-selling book.  And yet so few of us actually do it.  TED Fellow and Brazilian entrepreneur
Bel Pesce
breaks down five easy-to-believe myths that ensure your dream projects will never come to fruition.

8 Secrets of Success (3:30) [LANGUAGE]
Why do people succeed?  Is it because they're smart?  Or are they just lucky? Neither.  Analyst Richard St. John condenses years of interviews into an unmissable 3-minute slideshow on the real secrets of success.
 
A Better Way to Talk About Love (15:17)                                                                               01/11/2017
In love, we fall. We're struck, we're crushed, we swoon.  We burn with passion.  Love makes us crazy and makes us sick.  Our hearts ache, and then they break. Talking about love in this way fundamentally shapes how we experience it, says writer Mandy Len Catron.  In this talk for anyone who's ever felt crazy in love, Catron highlights a different metaphor for love that may help us find more joy — and less suffering — in it.

       Dare to Disagree (12:48)
Most people instinctively avoid conflict, but as Margaret Heffernan shows us, good disagreement is central to progress.  She illustrates (sometimes counterintuitively) how the best partners aren’t echo chambers — and how great research teams, relationships and businesses allow people to deeply disagree.      
 
       Depression, The Secret we Share 
(29:21)
"The opposite of depression is not happiness, but vitality, and it was vitality that seemed to seep away from me in that moment."  In a talk equal parts eloquent and devastating, writer Andrew Solomon takes you to the darkest corners of his mind during the years he battled depression. That led him to an eye-opening journey across the world to interview others with depression — only to discover that, to his surprise, the more he talked, the more people wanted to tell their own stories.

How Frustration can Make Us More Creative (15:32)                                    09/24/2016
Challenges and problems can derail your creative process ... or they can make you more creative than ever. In the surprising story behind the best-selling solo piano album of all time, Tim Harford may just convince you of the advantages of having to work with a little mess.
   
Falling in Love is the Easy Part 
(13:53)                                                                                  10/22/2016
Did you know you can fall in love with anyone just by asking them 36 questions?  
Mandy Len Catron tried this experiment, it worked, and she wrote a viral article about it (that your mom probably sent you). But … is that real love? Did it last? And what’s the difference between falling in love and staying in love?

Personal Tales from the Edge (15:46)                                 
For many years Sergeant Kevin Briggs had a dark, unusual, at times strangely rewarding job: He patrolled the southern end of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, a popular site for suicide attempts. In a sobering, deeply personal talk Briggs shares stories from those he’s spoken — and listened — to standing on the edge of life. He gives a powerful piece of advice to those with loved ones who might be contemplating suicide.

The Agony of Trying to Unsubscribe (7:40)
It happens to all of us: you unsubscribe from an unwanted marketing email, and a few days later another message from the same company pops up in your inbox.  Comedian James Veitch turned this frustration into whimsy when a local supermarket refused to take no for an answer. Hijinks ensued.
 
We have all experienced moments in our lives where everything just comes together in some almost magical way --whether playing music, participating in a sport, or just getting totally absorbed in a project. These moments are timeless, effortless, completely free of worry and delicious! As described by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, this is "flow" and is often a hallmark of exemplary performance --whether it is Michael Jordan scoring 50 points in a basketball game, or someone rising to a challenge that they never thought they would be able to handle.

We're lucky if we get into this "flow state" a few times in our entire lives. Is this flow state that hard to achieve? Is it more accessible to all of us than we think? And are we the only barrier that is keeping us getting into flow?

Judson Brewer MD PhD, an addiction psychiatrist and neuroscientist at Yale University outlines several common ways that we get in our own way. Using examples such as Lolo Jones tripping on a hurdle in the 2008 Beijing Olympics and smokers resisting their cravings, he describes how we can get caught up in thinking, as well as resisting our own body sensations as ways that we prevent ourselves from performing optimally, in whatever situation arises. 

He details how his clinical research has found that techniques that help us get out of our own way, such as mindfulness training, can have large effects; for example, in a randomized controlled clinical trial for smoking cessation performed at the Yale University School of Medicine, Dr. Brewer's laboratory found that mindfulness training showed twice quit rates compared to the American Lung Association's Freedom From Smoking program. 

He also describes the brain processes behind getting in our own way, which involve a network of brain regions dubbed the "default mode network" because of how often it gets activated --for example, when we are regretting something we did in the past or worry about something in the future. Importantly, he details some of the neuroimaging research his laboratory at Yale University has performed using experienced meditators, and how he found that a key region of the default mode network, the posterior cingulate cortex, gets deactivated during meditation. This work suggests that the posterior cingulate cortex may be a key brain marker for both getting in our own way and stepping out. 

He finishes by listing some simple ways that we can pay attention so we can get out of our own way in our everyday lives. He also unveils a new fMRI neurofeedback tool that can track and potentially augment training of this elusive flow state. 

Getting Stuck in the Negatives (and how to get out of them) (8:22)
Alison Ledgerwood joined the Department of Psychology at UC Davis in 2008 after completing her PhD in social psychology at New York University. She is interested in understanding how people think, and how they can think better. Her research, which is funded by the National Science Foundation, investigates how certain ways of thinking about an issue tend to stick in people's heads. Her classes on social psychology focus on understanding the way people think and behave in social situations, and how to harness that knowledge to potentially improve the social world in which we all live.

How Frustration can make us more creative
(15:32)
Challenges and problems can derail your creative process ... or they can make you more creative than ever.  In the surprising story behind the best-selling solo piano album of all time, Tim Harford may just convince you of the advantages of having to work with a little mess.
 
How to Make Stress Your Friend (14:25)
Stress. It makes your heart pound, your breathing quicken and your forehead sweat.  But while stress has been made into a public health enemy, new research suggests that stress may only be bad for you if you believe that to be the case.  Psychologist Kelly McGonigal urges us to see stress as a positive, and introduces us to an unsung mechanism for stress reduction: reaching out to others.
  
How to Stay Calm when You Know You'll Be Stressed (12:20)
You're not at your best when you're stressed. In fact, your brain has evolved over millennia to release cortisol in stressful situations, inhibiting rational, logical thinking but potentially helping you survive, say, being attacked by a lion.  Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin thinks there's a way to avoid making critical mistakes in stressful situations, when your thinking becomes clouded — the pre-mortem.  "We all are going to fail now and then," he says.  "The idea is to think ahead to what those failures might be."
 
On Bring Wrong (17:51)
Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong.  But what if we're wrong about that? "Wrongologist" Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting but embracing our fallibility.
 
Optimism Bias (17:33)
Are we born to be optimistic, rather than realistic?  Tali Sharot shares new research that suggests our brains are wired to look on the bright side — and how that can be both dangerous and beneficial.
 
Strange Answers to the Psychopath Test (18:01)
Is there a definitive line that divides crazy from sane?  With a hair-raising delivery, Jon Ronson, author of The Psychopath Test, illuminates the gray areas between the two.  (With live-mixed sound by Julian Treasure and animation by Evan Grant.)
   
The Agony of Trying to Unsubscribe (7:40) [Comedy]
It happens to all of us: you unsubscribe from an unwanted marketing email, and a few days later another message from the same company pops up in your inbox. Comedian James Veitch turned this frustration into whimsy when a local supermarket refused to take no for an answer. Hijinks ensued.

The Price of Happiness (14:40)
Can happiness be bought?  To find out, author Benjamin Wallace sampled the world's most expensive products, including a bottle of 1947 Chateau Cheval Blanc, 8 ounces of Kobe beef and the fabled (notorious) Kopi Luwak coffee.  His critique may surprise you.
 
Why we all need to practice Emotional First Aid (17:24)                                         11/00/2014
We'll go to the doctor when we feel flu-ish or a nagging pain. So why don’t we see a health professional when we feel emotional pain: guilt, loss, loneliness? Too many of us deal with common psychological-health issues on our own, says Guy Winch. But we don’t have to. He makes a compelling case to practice emotional hygiene — taking care of our emotions, our minds, with the same diligence we take care of our bodies.

Why we do what we do (21:45) [LANGUAGE]
Tony Robbins discusses the "invisible forces" that motivate everyone's actions.
  
What Makes us Feel Good about Our Work (20:26)
What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money.  But it's not exactly joy either.  It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose.  Behavioral economist Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes toward meaning in our work.


Fact or Fiction
How to Seperate Fact and Fiction Online  (13:29)                                                         12/20/2016
By the end of this talk, there will be 864 more hours of video on YouTube and 2.5 million more photos on Facebook and Instagram.  So how do we sort through the deluge?  At the TEDSalon in London, Markham Nolan shares the investigative techniques he and his team use to verify information in real-time, to let you know if that Statue of Liberty image has been doctored or if that video leaked from Syria is legitimate.


Failure
The Fringe Benefits of Failure (20:57)                                                                                    10/23/2016
At her Harvard commencement speech, "Harry Potter" author JK Rowling offers some powerful, heartening advice to dreamers and overachievers, including one hard-won lesson that she deems "worth more than any qualification I ever earned."  TED Video


From Tragedy to Perseverance
A Broken Body Isn't A Broken Person (18:57)
Olympic hopeful cross-country skier Janine Shepherd shares a powerful story about the human potential for recovery when her live and hopes abruptly change in seconds.
The message: You are not your body, and giving up old dreams can allow new ones to soar. 


Future Employment
How the Blockchain is Changing Money and Business (18:49)
What is the blockchain?  If you don't know, you should; if you do, chances are you still need some clarification on how it actually works.  Don Tapscott is here to help, demystifying this world-changing, trust-building technology which, he says, represents nothing less than the second generation of the internet and holds the potential to transform money, business, government and society.

The Next Manufacturing Revolution is Here (12:26)
Economic growth has been slowing for the past 50 years, but relief might come from an unexpected place — a new form of manufacturing that is neither what you thought it was nor where you thought it was. Industrial systems thinker Olivier Scalabre details how a fourth manufacturing revolution will produce a macroeconomic shift and boost employment, productivity and growth.

The Workforce Crisis of 2030 - and How to Start Solving it Now (12:47)
It sounds counterintuitive, but by 2030, many of the world's largest economies will have more jobs than adult citizens to do those jobs. In this data-filled — and quite charming — talk, human resources expert Rainer Strack suggests that countries ought to look across borders for mobile and willing job seekers. But to do that, they need to start by changing the culture in their businesses.

What Will Future Jobs Look Like (14:15)                                                                               10/04/2016
Economist Andrew McAfee suggests that, yes, probably, droids will take our jobs — or at least the kinds of jobs we know now. In this far-seeing talk, he thinks through what future jobs might look like, and how to educate coming generations to hold them.


Generations
Why 30 is NOT the new 20 (14:49)                                                                                           11/15/2016
Clinical psychologist Meg Jay has a bold message for twentysomethings: Contrary to popular belief, your 20s are not a throwaway decade. In this provocative talk, Jay says that just because marriage, work and kids are happening later in life, doesn’t mean you can’t start planning now. She gives 3 pieces of advice for how twentysomethings can re-claim adulthood in the defining decade of their lives.


Global Challenges
Alzheimer's is not normal aging — and we can cure it (7:53)
More than 40 million people worldwide suffer from Alzheimer's disease, and that number is expected to increase drastically in the coming years. But no real progress has been made in the fight against the disease since its classification more than 100 years ago. Scientist Samuel Cohen shares a new breakthrough in Alzheimer's research from his lab as well as a message of hope. "Alzheimer's is a disease," Cohen says, "and we can cure it."

When faced with a parent suffering from Alzheimer's, most of us respond with denial
("It won't happen to me") or extreme efforts at prevention. But global health expert and TED Fellow Alanna Shaikh sees it differently. She's taking three concrete steps to prepare for the moment — should it arrive — when she herself gets Alzheimer's disease.

The Risky Politics of Progress (18:16)                                                                                    11/15/2016
Global problems such as terrorism, inequality and political dysfunction aren't easy to solve, but that doesn't mean we should stop trying. In fact, suggests journalist Jonathan Tepperman, we might even want to think riskier. He traveled the world to ask global leaders how they're tackling hard problems — and unearthed surprisingly hopeful stories that he's distilled into three tools for problem-solving.

What you can do to prevent Alzheimer's (13:56)                                                          05/01/2017
Alzheimer's doesn't have to be your brain's destiny, says neuroscientist and author of "Still Alice," Lisa Genova. She shares the latest science investigating the disease — and some promising research on what each of us can do to build an Alzheimer's-resistant brain.

 
Gut Feelings
Go with your Gut Feeling (19:05)
Magnue Walker talks about his life journey of following his passion and going with his gut feeling which eventually led him to turning his dreams into his reality.

Sweat the Small Stuff 
(12:37)
It may seem that big problems require big solutions, but ad man Rory Sutherland says many flashy, expensive fixes are just obscuring better, simpler answers.  To illustrate, he uses behavioral economics and hilarious examples.


Hacking
All Your Devices Can Be Hacked (16:56)                                                                             02/03/2017
Could someone hack your pacemaker? Avi Rubin shows how hackers are compromising cars, smartphones and medical devices, and warns us about the dangers of an increasingly hack-able world.

 

Happiness 
All It Takes is 10 Mindful Minutes (9:24)
When is the last time you did absolutely nothing for 10 whole minutes? Not texting, talking or even thinking? Mindfulness expert Andy Puddicombe describes the transformative power of doing just that: Refreshing your mind for 10 minutes a day, simply by being mindful and experiencing the present moment. (No need for incense or sitting in uncomfortable positions.

Choice, Happiness and Spaghetti Sauce (17:30)
"Tipping Point" author Malcolm Gladwell gets inside the food industry's pursuit of the perfect spaghetti sauce — and makes a larger argument about the nature of choice and happiness.

"Flow", the Secret to Happiness (18:55)
What makes a life worth living/  Money cannot make us happy.  Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi looks to those who find pleasure and lasting satisfaction in activities that bring about a state of "flow".

Happiness and its Surprises (19:45)
Cognitive researcher Nancy Etcoff looks at happiness — the ways we try to achieve and increase it, the way it's untethered to our real circumstances, and its surprising effect on our bodies.

Happiness and Why We Want It (14:14)
Cognitive researcher Nancy Etcoff looks at happiness — the ways we try to achieve and increase it, the way it's untethered to our real circumstances, and its surprising effect on our bodies.

How to Buy Happiness (10:58)                                                                                                   2010/09/2016
At TEDxCambridge, Michael Norton shares fascinating research on how money can, indeed buy happiness — when you don't spend it on yourself. Listen for surprising data on the many ways pro-social spending can benefit you, your work, and (of course) other people.
 
How to Find Work You Love (6:20)
Scott Dinsmore quit a job that made him miserable, and spend the next four years wondering how to find work that was joyful and meaningful.  He shares what he learned in this deceptively simple talk about finding out what matters to you - and then getting started doing it.

How to Stay Calm when you know You'll be Stressed (12:20)                            08/31/2016
You're not at your best when you're stressed.  In fact, your brain has evolved over millennia to release cortisol in stress situations, inhibiting rational, logical thinking but potentially helping you survive, say, being attacked by a lion.  Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin things there's a way to avoid making critical mistakes in stressful situations, when your thinking becomes clouded - the pre-mortem.  "We all are going to fail now and then," he said.  "The idea is to think ahead to what those failures might be."

How to Succeed? Get more sleep (5:49)
Writer and designer Graham Hill asks:  Can having less stuff, in less room, lead to more happiness?  He makes the case for taking up less space, and lays out three rules for editing your life.

Less Stuff, More Happiness (4:10)
In this short talk, Arianna Huffington shares a small idea that can awaken much bigger ones: the power of a good night's sleep. Instead of bragging about our sleep deficits, she urges us to shut our eyes and see the big picture: We can sleep our way to increased productivity and happiness — and smarter decision-making.

Measuring What Makes Life Worthwhile (17:39)                                                            02/00/2010
When the dotcom bubble burst, hotelier Chip Conley went in search of a business model based on happiness. In an old friendship with an employee and in the wisdom of a Buddhist king, he learned that success comes from what you count.

Older People are Happier (11:38)                                                                                              01/25/2017
In the 20th century we added an unprecedented number of years to our lifespans, but is the quality of life as good? Surprisingly, yes! Psychologist Laura Carstensen shows research that demonstrates that as people get older they become happier, more content, and have a more positive outlook on the world.

Remember to say Thank You (3:29)
In this deceptively simple 3-minute talk, Dr. Laura Trice muses on the power of the magic words "thank you" — to deepen a friendship, to repair a bond, to make sure another person knows what they mean to you. Try it.

Should you live for your resume ... or your eulogy?  (5:01)
David Brooks (NBC News) shares his view in this thought provoking presentation.
Reinhold Niebuhr:  "Nothing that is worth doing can be achieved in our lifetime; therefore we must be saved by hope.  Nothing which is true or beautiful or good makes complete sense in
any immediate context of history; therefore we must be saved by faith.  Nothing we do,
however virtuous, can be accomplished alone; therefore we must be saved by love.  No virtuous
act is quite as virtuous from the standpoint of our friend or foe as from our own standpoint.
Therefore we must be saved by that final form of love, which is forgiveness.”

The Art of Stillness (15:37)
The place that travel writer Pico Iyer would most like to go? Nowhere. In a counterintuitive and lyrical meditation, Iyer takes a look at the incredible insight that comes with taking time for stillness. In our world of constant movement and distraction, he teases out strategies we all can use to take back a few minutes out of every day, or a few days out of every season. It's the talk for anyone who feels overwhelmed by the demands for our world.

The Hidden Power of Smiling (7:26)
Ron Gutman reviews a raft of studies about smiling, and reveals some surprising results. Did you know your smile can be a predictor of how long you'll live — and that a simple smile has a measurable effect on your overall well-being? Prepare to flex a few facial muscles as you learn more about this evolutionary contagious behavior.

The Riddle of Experience vs. Memory (20:06)
Using examples from vacations to colonoscopies, Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman reveals how our "experiencing selves" and our "remembering selves" perceive happiness differently. This new insight has profound implications for economics, public policy — and our own self-awareness.

The Surprising Power of Happiness (21:16)
Dan Gilbert, author of "Stumbling on Happiness," challenges the idea that we’ll be miserable if we don’t get what we want.  Our "psychological immune system" lets us feel truly happy even when things don’t go as planned.
 
What Makes a Good Life? Lessons from Longest Study on Happiness (12:46)
What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life.

Want to be happier? Stay in the moment (10:16)                                                           10/16/2016
When are humans most happy? To gather data on this question, Matt Killingsworth built an app, Track Your Happiness, that let people report their feelings in real time. Among the surprising results: We're often happiest when we're lost in the moment. And the flip side: The more our mind wanders, the less happy we can be.

Why are we happy?  (21:00)
Well, it turns out when brains triple in size, they don't just get three times bigger; they gain new structures. 

Why We Laugh (17:04)                                                                                                                           04/01/2017
Did you know that you're 30 times more likely to laugh if you're with somebody else than if you're alone? Cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott shares this and other surprising facts about laughter in this fast-paced, action-packed and, yes, hilarious dash through the science of cracking up.

Why You Should Take Time to Play (27:47)                                                                        10/08/2016
Play invites creativity and collaboration, and can inspire you to think out of the box! Take a recess and learn about the benefits of connecting with your inner-child.  Presentation by Tim Brown.
 

Help
Are You a Giver or a Taker? (13:28)                                                                                         11/00/2016    
In every workplace, there are three basic kinds of people: givers, takers and matchers. Organizational psychologist Adam Grant breaks down these personalities and offers simple strategies to promote a culture of generosity and keep self-serving employees from taking more than their share.

Asking for help is a strength, not a weakness (11:55)                                            00/00/2016
We all go through challenges — some you can see, most you can't, says Michele L. Sullivan. In a talk about perspective, Sullivan shares stories full of wit and wisdom and reminds us that we're all part of each other's support systems. "The only shoes you can walk in are your own," she says. "With compassion, courage and understanding, we can walk together, side by side."

          Want to help someone? Shut up and listen! (17:09)                                                  09/00/2012
          When most well-intentioned aid workers hear of a problem they think they can fix, they go
          to work. This, Ernesto Sirolli suggests, is naïve. In this funny and impassioned talk, he
          proposes that the first step is to listen to the people you're trying to help, and tap into their
          own entrepreneurial spirit. His advice on what works will help any entrepreneur.

  
Hiring
6 Talks with Big Ideas for Hiring
 
Hire the hackers! (18:32)
Hackers are, generally, thought of as common criminals.  But there is another way to treat coders who use their talents to point out flaws in cyber-security measures rather than to steal money, says underworld investigator Misha Glenny.  At TEDGlobal 2011, he suggests a bold reversal: instead of prosecuting hackers, engage them and even put them to work.
 
Are droids taking our jobs? (14:00 )
With unemployment high, people are very concerned with the question, "Are robots and computer programs taking over jobs that people could be doing?"  At TEDxBoston, Andrew McAfee admits that, yes, they are.  But this is no reason to dispair, McAfee says. Because human beings will always excel in one area that digital technology cannot complete: coming up with new ideas.
 
Jobs for 1 Million Women (6:24)
In India, an estimated 700 to 800 million people live on less than two dollars a day. Maria van der Heijden, who founded Women on Wings, shares a vision for how to change this equation — by hiring women for jobs that pay a living wage.  In this talk from TEDxDelft, van der Heijden shares how she hopes to employ a million women by connecting their handiwork with global markets.
 
3 Stories of local eco-entrepreneurship (17:59)
Brenda Palms-Barber of Chicago, Illinois, took an interesting approach when she started a line of skincare products made from honey. She hired ex-convicts to care for the bees. The idea was to give them employment experience and teach them life skills that could keep them from returning to prison. In this talk from TEDxMidwest, Majora Carter looks at Palms-Barber’s approach — as well as the approaches of two others — to work toward a greener planet and, in the process, hire local workers.
 
The Future of Work (5:43)
Heiko Fischer builds a strong case for turning Human Resources on its head by enabling employees to become resourceful humans instead.
 
Institutions vs. Collaboration (6:24)
There are two ways to accomplish a business goal, says Clay Shirky at TEDGlobal 2005. You can build an institution with employees, and then layers on top of those employees to manage them.  Or you can build a mechanism that allows for collaboration, and harness the spirit of hobbyists and volunteers.  In this talk, Shirky explores the upsides and downsides of hiring versus coordinating.

 
Hiring the Unemployable
(16:05)
A trip to a bakery always ends up delivering a cookie and a smile, but at a bakery run by Mike Brady and Dion Drew, the extra icing is its stated goal of also serving up a second chance. The recipe for the success of their enterprise includes a commitment to employing a range of chronically unemployed people, including former convicts and recovering addicts.
   
Returning to the Workforce after Career Breaks
(12:01)
If you've taken a career break and are now looking to return to the workforce, would you consider taking an internship?  Career reentry expert Carol Fishman Cohen thinks you should. In this talk, hear about Cohen's own experience returning to work after a career break, her work championing the success of "relaunchers" and how employers are changing how they engage with return-to-work talent.
   
Why the Best Hire Might NOT have the Perfect Resume (10:31)
Given the choice between a job candidate with a perfect resume and one who has fought through difficulty, human resources executive Regina Hartley always gives the "Scrapper" a chance.  As someone who grew up with adversity, Hartley knows that those who flourish in the darkest of spaces are empowered with the grit to persist in an ever-changing workplace. "Choose the underestimated contender, whose secret weapons are passion and purpose," she says. "Hire the Scrapper."
  
  
Ideas
Where do ideas come from? (@3:40:00)                                                                                   2016-12-11
A TED Playlist consisting of 9 Talks that explores many areas such as how does the metaphorical lightbumb go off?  Is it a flash of genius?  The power of crowds?  These heady talks explore the nature of ideas themselves:  Where they come from, how they evolve, and how each of us can nuture them.  Good ideas bring attention and recognition which is all good.  Topics are:
-  Where good ideas come from by Steven Johnson (17:45)
-  Your elusive creative genius by Elizabeth Gilbert (19:09)
-  How to start a movement by Derek Sivers (3:09)
-  How to get your ideas to spread by Seth Godin (17:01)
-  Where does creativity hide? by Amy Tan (22:52)
-  The surprising habits of original thinkers by Adam Grant (15:25)
-  When ideas have sex by Matt Ridley (16:26)
-  Embrace the remix by Kirby Ferguson (9:42)
-  4 lessons in creativity by Julie Burstein (17:20)
Links for all of the above TED Talks are available through the link Where do ideas come from?


Imagination
Before Avatar ... a curious boy (17:08)                                                                                  2016/11/15
James Cameron's big-budget (and even bigger-grossing) films create unreal worlds all their own. In this personal talk, he reveals his childhood fascination with the fantastic — from reading science fiction to deep-sea diving — and how it ultimately drove the success of his blockbuster hits "Aliens," "The Terminator," "Titanic" and "Avatar."

  
 
Interview
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How to Stay Calm when You Know You'll Be Stressed  (12:20)
    -  Amy Cuddy


Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are (21:02)
    -  Amy Cuddy

How to Speak so that People WANT to Listen (9:58)
   -  Julian Treasure
 
10 Ways to have a Better Conversation (11:44)
   -  Celeste Headles

What Makes Us Feel Good about Our Work? (20:26)
   -  Dan Ariely



10 Ways to have a Better Conversation (11:44)
When your job hinges on how well you talk to people, you learn a lot about how to have conversations — and that most of us don't converse very well.  Celeste Headlee has worked as a radio host for decades, and she knows the ingredients of a great conversation: Honesty, brevity, clarity and a healthy amount of listening. In this insightful talk, she shares 10 useful rules for having better conversations.  "Go out, talk to people, listen to people," she says.  "And, most importantly, be prepared to be amazed."
  
 
How to Speak so that People Want to Listen (9:58)
Have you ever felt like you're talking, but nobody is listening?  Here's Julian Treasure to help. In this useful talk, the sound expert demonstrates the how-to's of powerful speaking — from some handy vocal exercises to tips on how to speak with empathy. A talk that might help the world sound more beautiful.
 
The Art of the Interview (20:54)
Marc Pachter has conducted live interviews with some of the most intriguing characters in recent American history as part of a remarkable series created for the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery.  He reveals the secret to a great interview and shares extraordinary stories of talking with Steve Martin, Clare Booth Luce and more.
 
Connected, but alone? (19:48)
As we expect more from technology, do we expect less from each other?  Sherry Turkle studies how our devices and online personas are redefining human connection and communication — and asks us to think deeply about the new kinds of connection we want to have.
 
The Power of Vulnerability (20:19)
Brené Brown studies human connection — our ability to empathize, belong, love.  In a poignant, funny talk, she shares a deep insight from her research, one that sent her on a personal quest to know herself as well as to understand humanity.
 
The Danger of Silence (4:18)
"We spend so much time listening to the things people are saying that we rarely pay attention to the things they don't," says poet and teacher Clint Smith.  A short, powerful piece from the heart, about finding the courage to speak up against ignorance and injustice.
 
Take the Other to Lunch (11:08)
There's an angry divisive tension in the air that threatens to make modern politics impossible. Elizabeth Lesser explores the two sides of human nature within us (call them "the mystic" and "the warrior”) that can be harnessed to elevate the way we treat each other. She shares a simple way to begin real dialogue — by going to lunch with someone who doesn't agree with you, and asking them three questions to find out what's really in their hearts.
 
Are You Human? (4:34)
Have you ever wondered: Am I a human being?  Ze Frank suggests a series of simple questions that will determine this.  Please relax and follow the prompts.  Let's begin … 
 
What I Learned from 32 Grueling Interviews (8:04)
What’s less fun than a job interview?  Try doing it again. And again.  And again.  
Ashwin Naik endured 32 interviews before she landed a job and kept notes on every experience and lesson along the way.  Ranging from funny to unbelievable, she shares what she learned (Lesson 3. don’t wear green) and shows what it’s like to search for work as an aspiring businesswoman in India.
 
Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are (21:02)
Body language affects how others see us, but it may also change how we see ourselves. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing” — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.


Jobs
Machine learning isn't just for simple tasks like assessing credit risk and sorting mail anymore — today, it's capable of far more complex applications, like grading essays and diagnosing diseases. With these advances comes an uneasy question: Will a robot do your job in the future?
Anthony Goldblook presents his vision.

Will automation take away all our jobs? (18:37)                                                               04/03/2017
Here's a paradox you don't hear much about: despite a century of creating machines to do our work for us, the proportion of adults in the US with a job has consistently gone up for the past 125 years. Why hasn't human labor become redundant and our skills obsolete? In this talk about the future of work, economist David Autor addresses the question of why there are still so many jobs and comes up with a surprising, hopeful answer.


Leadership
BEING A GOOD MENTOR
Everyone should have a mentor and more good people should be mentors.  Here is material
provided by TED on "How to be a good mentor."  Not everyone has the skills to be a good mentor, but give it a try.  Everyone wins if you can do it!

                   Forget the pecking order at work (15:47)    2016/11/15
                   Organizations are often run according to "the superchicken model," where the value is
                   placed on star employees who outperform others.  And yet, this isn't what drives the
                   most high-achieving teams.  Business leader Margaret Heffernan observes that it is
                   social cohesion — built every coffee break, every time one team member asks another
                   for help — that leads over time to great results.  It's a radical rethink of what drives us
                   to do our best work, and what it means to be a leader.  Because as Heffernan points
                   out: "Companies don't have ideas. Only people do."

Giving Up Control: Leadership in the Digital Era (10:33)                                       2016/09/24
In business today, the need for innovation and rapid decision-making trumps yesterday’s drive for efficiency. How does this influence what it means to be an effective leader?  Charlene Li explains that it’s less about control and more about empowerment: enabling employees to acquire the information they need, so they can make their own decisions.

How Great Leaders Inspire Action (18:02)                                                                           2016/10/04
Simon Sinek has a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership — starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?" His examples include Apple, Martin Luther King, and the Wright brothers ...

Learning to be Awesome at Anything You Do Including Being a Leader (15:50)
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Can we learn to lead, or is leadership something we're born with? In this thought-provoking talk, Tasha Eurich shares a prescription to be not just awesome at leadership, but anything else you want to improve.

With a contagious passion and energy, Tasha Eurich pairs her scientific savvy in human behavior with a practical approach to solving business challenges. Her life's work is to help companies succeed by making their leaders awesome. In 2013, Tasha released her first book "Bankable Leadership: Happy People, Bottom Line Results and the Power to Deliver Both." It debuted at #8 on the New York Times best-seller list and was named a Top 10 Small Business book by Small Business Trends in 2013.

Four-star US General Stanley McChrystal shares what he learned about leadership over his decades in the military.  How can you build a sense of shared purpose among people of many ages and skill sets?  By listening and learning — and addressing the possibility of failure.  It is no surprise General Crystal indicates "To inspire others and create a shared sense of puporse, it is essential to listen first."

The Difference between Winning and Succeeding (17:36)
With profound simplicity, Coach John Wooden redefines success and urges us all to pursue the best in ourselves. In this inspiring talk he shares the advice he gave his players at UCLA, quotes poetry and remembers his father's wisdom.

Why Good Leaders Make You Feel Safe (11:59)
What makes a great leader?  Management theorist Simon Sinek suggests, it’s someone who makes their employees feel secure, who draws staffers into a circle of trust.  But creating trust and safety — especially in an uneven economy — means taking on big responsibility.

 
Learning       
3 Things I Learned while my Plane Crashed  (5:02)                                                  2016/11/15
Ric Elias had a front-row seat on Flight 1549, the plane that crash-landed in the Hudson River
in New York in January 2009.v What went through his mind as the doomed plane went down?
At TED, he tells his story publicly for the first time.

Can We Build AI without Losing Control Over It? (14:27)                                      2016/09/29
Scared of superintelligent AI?  You should be, says neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris — and not just in some theoretical way.  We're going to build superhuman machines, says Harris, but we haven't yet grappled with the problems associated with creating something that may treat us the way we treat ants.

On being wrong (17:51)                                                                                                                     2016/11/15
Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong. But what if we're wrong about that? "Wrongologist" Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting but embracing our fallibility.

Wofford College president Ben Dunlap tells the story of Sandor Teszler, a Hungarian Holocaust survivor who taught him about passionate living and lifelong learning.

The Nerd's Guide to Learning Everything Online (18:10)
Some of us learn best in the classroom, and some of us ... well, we don't. But we still love to learn — we just need to find the way that works for us. In this charming, personal talk, author John Green shares the community of learning that he found in online video.

The Power of Believing That You Can Improve (10:20)
Carol Dweck researches “growth mindset” — the idea that we can grow our brain's capacity to learn and to solve problems. In this talk, she describes two ways to think about a problem that’s slightly too hard for you to solve. Are you not smart enough to solve it … or have you just not solved it yet? A great introduction to this influential field.
 
         
Living
How to Live to be 100+ (19:39)                                                                                                  01/25/2017
To find the path to long life and health, Dan Buettner and team study the world's "Blue Zones," communities whose elders live with vim and vigor to record-setting age. In his talk, he shares the 9 common diet and lifestyle habits that keep them spry past age 100.

What Makes a Good Life (12:46)                                                                                                 04/01/2017
What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life. 


Listening
5 Days to Listen Better (7:50)
In our louder and louder world, says sound expert Julian Treasure, "We are losing our listening."
In this short, fascinating talk, Treasure shares five ways to re-tune your ears for conscious listening - to other people and the world around you.
 
 
Love
An Ode to Envy (13:11)                                                                                                                                         2016/10/28
What is jealousy? What drives it, and why do we secretly love it?  No study has ever been able to capture its "loneliness, longevity, grim thrill" — that is, says Parul Sehgal, except for fiction. In an eloquent meditation she scours pages from literature to show how jealousy is not so different from a quest for knowledge.

Falling in Love is the Easy Part (13.53)                                                                                           2016/10/28
Did you know you can fall in love with anyone just by asking them 36 questions?  Mandy Len Catron tried this experiment, it worked, and she wrote a viral article about it (that your mom probably sent you). But … is that real love? Did it last?  And what’s the difference between falling in love and staying in love?

How I Hacked Online Dating (17:27)                                                                                                   2016/10/28
Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating.  The dates she liked didn't write her back, and her own profile attracted crickets (and worse).  So, as any fan of data would do: she started making a spreadsheet.  Hear the story of how she went on to hack her online dating life — with frustrating, funny and life-changing results.

Love, No Matter What (23:27)                                                                                                                       2016/10/28
What is it like to raise a child who's different from you in some fundamental way (like a prodigy, or a differently abled kid, or a criminal)?  In this quietly moving talk, writer Andrew Solomon shares what he learned from talking to dozens of parents -- asking them: What's the line between unconditional love and unconditional acceptance?

Love Letters to a Stranger (4:52)                                                                                                           2016/10/28
Hannah Brencher's mother always wrote her letters.  So when she felt herself bottom into depression after college, she did what felt natural — she wrote love letters and left them for strangers to find.  The act has become a global initiative, The World Needs More Love Letters, which rushes handwritten letters to those in need of a boost.

My Daughter, My Wife, our Robot & the Quest for Immortality (21:04)     2016/10/28
The founder of Sirius XM satellite radio, Martine Rothblatt now heads up a drug company that makes life-saving medicines for rare diseases (including one drug that saved her own daughter's life).  Meanwhile she is working to preserve the consciousness of the woman she loves in a digital file ... and a companion robot. In an onstage conversation with TED's Chris Anderson, Rothblatt shares her powerful story of love, identity, creativity, and limitless possibility.

Remember to say Thank You (3:26)                                                                                                     2016/10/28
In this deceptively simple 3-minute talk, Dr. Laura Trice muses on the power of the magic words "thank you" — to deepen a friendship, to repair a bond, to make sure another person knows what they mean to you.  Try it.

The Brain in Love (15:56)                                                                                                                                   2016/10/28
Why do we crave love so much, even to the point that we would die for it?  To learn more about our very real, very physical need for romantic love, Helen Fisher and her research team took MRIs of people in love — and people who had just been dumped.

The Mathematics of Love (17:02)                                                                                                            2016/10/28
Finding the right mate is no cakewalk — but is it even mathematically likely?  In a charming talk, mathematician Hannah Fry shows patterns in how we look for love, and gives her top three tips (verified by math!) for finding that special someone.

The Secret to Desire in a Long-term Relationship (10:19)                                    2016/10/28
In long-term relationships, we often expect our beloved to be both best friend and erotic partner.  But as Esther Perel argues, good and committed sex draws on two conflicting needs: our need for security and our need for surprise.  So how do you sustain desire? With wit and eloquence, Perel lets us in on the mystery of erotic intelligence.

The Smelly Mystery of the Human Pheromone (14:53)                                            2016/10/28
Do our smells make us sexy?  Popular science suggests yes — pheromones send chemical signals about sex and attraction from our armpits to potential mates.  But, despite what you might have heard, there is no conclusive research confirming that humans have these smell molecules.  In this eye-opening talk, zoologist Tristram Wyatt explains the fundamental flaws in current pheromone research, and shares his hope for a future that unlocks the fascinating, potentially life-saving knowledge tied up in our scent.

This is what enduring love looks like (10:18)                                                                  2016/10/28
Stacey Baker has always been obsessed with how couples meet.  When she asked photographer Alec Soth to help her explore this topic, they found themselves at the world’s largest speed-dating event, held in Las Vegas on Valentine’s Day, and at the largest retirement community in Nevada — with Soth taking portraits of pairs in each locale.  Between these two extremes, they unwound a beautiful through-line of how a couple goes from meeting to creating a life together. (This talk was part of a TED2015 session curated by Pop-Up Magazine: popupmagazine.com or @popupmag on Twitter.)

Why we Love, Why we Cheat (23:37)                                                                                        2016/10/28
Anthropologist Helen Fisher takes on a tricky topic – love – and explains its evolution, its biochemical foundations and its social importance. She closes with a warning about the potential disaster inherent in antidepressant abuse.



Lying
       How to Spot a Liar (18:34) 
On any given day we're lied to from 10 to 200 times, and the clues to detect those lie can be subtle and counter-intuitive.  Pamela Meyer, author of Liespotting, shows the manners and "hotspots" used by those trained to recognize deception — and she argues honesty is a value worth preserving.   
  
Behavioral economist Dan Ariely studies the bugs in our moral code: the hidden reasons we think it's OK to cheat or steal (sometimes).  Clever studies help make his point that we're predictably irrational — and can be influenced in ways we can't grasp.

       The Future of Lying 
(18:24)
Who hasn’t sent a text message saying “I’m on my way” when it wasn’t true or fudged the truth a touch in their online dating profile?  But Jeff Hancock doesn’t believe that the anonymity of the internet encourages dishonesty.  In fact, he says the searchability and permanence of information online may even keep us honest.
  
Using three iPods like magical props, Marco Tempest spins a clever, surprisingly heartfelt meditation on truth and lies, art and emotion.
  
       The Pattern Behind Self-Deception (18.54)
Michael Shermer says the human tendency to believe strange things — from alien abductions to dowsing rods — boils down to two of the brain's most basic, hard-wired survival skills.  He explains what they are, and how they get us into trouble.

Why People Believe Strange Things 
(13:25)                                                                       2016/10/15
Why do people see the Virgin Mary on a cheese sandwich or hear demonic lyrics in "Stairway to Heaven"? Using video and music, skeptic Michael Shermer shows how we convince ourselves to believe — and overlook the facts.

  
Magic
A Cyber Magic Card Trick Like No Other (6:35)                                                            2016/10/16
The suits, numbers and colors in a deck of cards correspond to the seasons, moon cycles and calendar.  Marco Tempest straps on augmented reality goggles and does a card trick like you’ve never seen before, weaving a lyrical tale as he deals. (This version fixes a glitch in the original performance, but is otherwise exactly as seen live by the TEDGlobal audience, including the dazzling augmented reality effects.)

A Magical Tale with an Augmented Reality (6:31)                                                      2016/10/16
Marco Tempest spins a beautiful story of what magic is, how it entertains us and how it highlights our humanity — all while working extraordinary illusions with his hands and an augmented reality machine.

And For My Next Trick, A Robot 
(6:18)                                                                                 2016/10/16
Marco Tempest uses charming stagecraft to demo EDI, the multi-purpose robot designed to work very closely with humans. Less a magic trick than an intricately choreographed performance, Tempest shows off the robot’s sensing technology, safety features and strength, and makes the case for a closer human-robot relationship. (Okay, there’s a little magic, too.)

How Equal Do We Want the World To Be? You'd Be Surprised! (8:53)         2016/10/16
The news of society's growing inequality makes all of us uneasy. But why?  Dan Ariely reveals some new, surprising research on what we think is fair, as far as how wealth is distributed over societies ... then shows how it stacks up to the real stats.

What Makes Us Feel Good about Our Work? (20:26)                                                   2016/10/16
What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money. But it's not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose. Behavioral economist 
Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes toward meaning in our work.


Medical Challenges
A Science Award that makes you laugh, then think (13:12)
As founder of the Lg Nobel awards, Marc Abrahams explores the world's most improbable research.  In this thought-provoking (and occasionally side-splitting) talk, he tells stories of truly weird science - and thus the case that silliness is critical to boosting public interest in science.

As a young surgeon, Peter Attia felt contempt for a patient with diabetes.  She was overweight, he thought, and thus responsible for the fact that she needed a foot amputation.  But years later, Attia received an unpleasant medical surprise that led him to wonder: is our understanding of diabetes right?  Could the precursors to diabetes cause obesity, and not the other way around?  A look at how assumptions may be leading us to wage the wrong medical war. 

What you can do to prevent Alzheimer's (13:56)
Alzheimer's doesn't have to be your brain's destiny, says neuroscientist and author of "Still Alice," Lisa Genova. She shares the latest science investigating the disease — and some promising research on what each of us can do to build an Alzheimer's-resistant brain.
   
  
       Memory
Feats of Memory Anyone Can Do (20:28)                                                                            2016/12/20
There are people who can quickly memorize lists of thousands of numbers, the order of all the cards in a deck (or ten!), and much more. Science writer Joshua Foer describes the technique — called the memory palace — and shows off its most remarkable feature: anyone can learn how to use it, including him.


Morals
Machine Intelligence makes Human Morals more Important (17:42)          2016/10/22
Machine intelligence is here, and we're already using it to make subjective decisions. But the complex way AI grows and improves makes it hard to understand and even harder to control. In this cautionary talk, techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci explains how intelligent machines can fail in ways that don't fit human error patterns — and in ways we won't expect or be prepared for. "We cannot outsource our responsibilities to machines," she says. "We must hold on ever tighter to human values and human ethics."


Music
A Musical Escape into a World of Light and Color (11:31)                                     10/28/2016
A genre unto herself, Kaki King fuses the ancient tradition of working with one's hands with digital technology, projection-mapping imagery onto her guitar in her groundbreaking multimedia work "The Neck Is a Bridge to the Body."  Using her guitar's neck like a keyboard, she plays an intricate melody as she takes the audience on a musical journey of light and sound.  She calls it "guitar as paintbrush."

An All-Star Set (25:05)                                                                                                                          12/20/2016/
Legendary jazz musician Herbie Hancock delivers a stunning performance alongside two old friends — past drummer for the Headhunters, Harvey Mason, and bassist Marcus Miller.  Listen to the end to hear them sweeten the classic "Watermelon Man."

Awoo (3:32)                                                                                                                                                    03/00/2017
Electro-pop duo Sofi Tukker dance it out with the TED audience in a performance of their upbeat, rhythmic song "Awoo," featuring Betta Lemme.

The Mad Scientist of Music (16:50)                                                                                             02/03/2017

Mark Applebaum writes music that breaks the rules in fantastic ways, composing a concerto for a florist and crafting a musical instrument from junk and found objects. This quirky talk might just inspire you to shake up the "rules" of your own creative work.

Singer Rhiannon Giddens joins international music collective Silk Road Ensemble to perform "St. James Infirmary Blues," spiking the American folk song that Louis Armstrong popularized in the 1920s with Romani influence and mischievous energy.  SilkRoadEnsemble.com

All under the age of 16, brothers Jonny, Robbie and Tommy Mizzone are from New Jersey, a US state that's better known for the rock of Bruce Springsteen than the bluegrass of Earl Scruggs. Nonetheless, the siblings began performing bluegrass covers, as well as their own compositions, at a young age.  Here, they play three dazzling songs in three different keys, passing the lead back and forth from fiddle to banjo to guitar.  BlueGrassToday.com

"Space Oddity" (6:09)                                                                                                                            2016/11/15
Singer Amanda Palmer pays tribute to the inimitable David Bowie with a cover of "Space Oddity." She's joined onstage by Jherek Bischoff, TED Fellow Usman Riaz and, no, your eyes are not deceiving you, none other than former Vice President Alfred E. Newman.

The Redemption Song
John Legend is on a mission to transform America's criminal justice system. Through his Free America campaign, he's encouraging rehabilitation and healing in our prisons, jails and detention centers — and giving hope to those who want to create a better life after serving their time. With a spoken-word prelude from James Cavitt, an inmate at San Quentin State Prison, Legend treats us to his version of Bob Marley's "Redemption Song." "Won't you help to sing these songs of freedom?" 


Nature
Nature, Beauty, Gratitude (9:39)
Nature’s beauty can be fleeting — but not through Louie Schwartzberg’s lens. His stunning time-lapse photography, accompanied by powerful words from Benedictine monk Brother David Steindl-Rast, serves as a meditation on being grateful for every day.


Negotiating
This is a collection of themed TED videos

In politics, it seems counter-intuitive to engage in dialogue with violent groups, with radicals and terrorists, and with the states that support them. But Jonas Gahr Støre, the foreign minister of Norway, makes a compelling case for open discussion, even when our values diverge.

The Art of Choosing (24:08)
Sheena Iyengar studies how we make choices — and how we feel about the choices we make.  At TEDGlobal, she talks about both trivial choices (Coke v. Pepsi) and profound ones, and shares her groundbreaking research that has uncovered some surprising attitudes about our decisions.

The Talk from No to Yes (18:45)
William Ury, author of "Getting to Yes," offers an elegant, simple (but not easy) way to create agreement in even the most difficult situations — from family conflict to, perhaps, the Middle East.

When you're making a deal, what's going on in your brain? (13:49)
When two people are trying to make a deal — whether they’re competing or cooperating — what’s really going on inside their brains? Behavioral economist Colin Camerer shows research that reveals how badly we predict what others are thinking.  Bonus: He presents an unexpected study that shows chimpanzees might just be better at it.

Why the Best Hire MIGHT Not have The Best Resume (10:31)
Given the choice between a job candidate with a perfect resume and one who has fought through difficulty, human resources executive Regina Hartley always gives the "Scrapper" a chance. As someone who grew up with adversity, Hartley knows that those who flourish in the darkest of spaces are empowered with the grit to persist in an ever-changing workplace. "Choose the underestimated contender, whose secret weapons are passion and purpose," she says. "Hire the Scrapper."

Why You Should Know How Much Your Coworkers Get Paid (7:29)
How much do you get paid?  How does it compare to the people you work with?  You should know, and so should they, says management researcher David Burkus. In this talk, Burkus questions our cultural assumptions around keeping salaries secret and makes a compelling case for why sharing them could benefit employees, organizations and society.


Original Thinkers
How to creative people come up with great ideas?  Organizational Psychologist Adam Grant studies "originals": thinkers who dream up new ideas and take action to put them into the world. In this talk, learn three unexpected habits of originals - including embracing failure.  "The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most, because they're the ones who try the most," Grant says.  "You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get to a few good ones."
 
Why You Should Take Time to Play (11:57)                                                                         2016/10/08
Play invites creativity and collaboration, and can inspire you to think out of the box! Take a recess and learn about the benefits of connecting with your inner-child.  [Good laughs!]


Passions
              Are We In Control of Our Own Decisions? (17:26)                                                       2016/10/16
Behavioral economist Dan Ariely, the author of Predictably Irrational, uses classic visual illusions and his own counterintuitive (and sometimes shocking) research findings to show how we're not as rational as we think when we make decisions.

Every Kid Needs a Champion (7:48)                                                                                         09/19/2016
Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, "They don't pay me to like the kids." Her response: "Kids don't learn from people they don't like.'" A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level.

How to Live Passionately - No Matter Your Age (8:16)                                           01/25/2017
Author Isabel Allende is 71. Yes, she has a few wrinkles—but she has incredible perspective too. In this candid talk, meant for viewers of all ages, she talks about her fears as she gets older and shares how she plans to keep on living passionately.

Reconnection with Compassion (15:53)                                                                                12/20/2016
The term "compassion" — typically reserved for the saintly or the sappy — has fallen out of touch with reality. At a special TEDPrize@UN, journalist Krista Tippett deconstructs the meaning of compassion through several moving stories, and proposes a new, more attainable definition for the word.

What are you passionate about?  You’re told these five words hold the key to a successful career and life purpose.  What if it’s the wrong question altogether?  This talk turns the ubiquitous “find your passion” message on its ear.  Terri Trespicio talks.
  
                Grit: The power of passion and perseverance (6:12)                                                04/00/2013
                    Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to
                    seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn't the only thing
                    separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of
                    "grit" as a predictor of success.
 
  

Entrepreneur Michael Litt gave his reaction to Larry Smith’s talk, titled, “Why you have to fail to have a great career.”  His idea: that failure provides the ultimate experience needed for success — learning to get up and dust yourself off after a fall.  Watch Litt’s candid telling of a time he failed professionally, big time.
 
In this funny and blunt talk, Larry Smith pulls no punches when he calls out the absurd excuses people invent when they fail to pursue their passions.
 

Passwords
What's Wrong with Your pa$$W0rd? (17:41)                                                         02/03/2017
Lorrie Faith Cranor studied thousands of real passwords to figure out the surprising, very common mistakes that users — and secured sites — make to compromise security. And how, you may ask, did she study thousands of real passwords without compromising the security of any users? That's a story in itself. It's secret data worth knowing, especially if your password is 12345
 

Perseverance
A Broken Body Isn't A Broken Person (18:57)
Olympic hopeful cross-country skier Janine Shepherd shares a powerful story about the human potential for recovery when her live and hopes abruptly change in seconds.  Speaker Bio
The message: You are not your body, and giving up old dreams can allow new ones to soar. 

Grit:  The Power of Passion and Perseverance (6:12)
Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn't the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of "grit" as a predictor of success.

 
Pheromones
The Smelly Mystery of the Human Pheromone (14:53)
Do our smells make us sexy? Popular science suggests yes — pheromones send chemical signals about sex and attraction from our armpits to potential mates. But, despite what you might have heard, there is no conclusive research confirming that humans have these smell molecules. In this eye-opening talk, zoologist Tristram Wyatt explains the fundamental flaws in current pheromone research, and shares his hope for a future that unlocks the fascinating, potentially life-saving knowledge tied up in our scent.


Planning
3 ways to plan for the (very) long term (13:42)                                                               04/10/2017
We increasingly make decisions based on short-term goals and gains — an approach that makes the future more uncertain and less safe. How can we learn to think about and plan for a better future in the long term ... like, grandchildren-scale long term? Ari Wallach shares three tactics for thinking beyond the immediate.
 

Play
Play is More than Fun, it's Viral (26:30)
A pioneer in research on play, Dr. Stuart Brown says humor, games, roughhousing, flirtation and fantasy are more than just fun.  Plenty of play in childhood makes for happy, smart adults — and keeping it up can make us smarter at any age.

Tales of Creativity and Play 
(27:58)                                                                                           2016/10/28
At the 2008 Serious Play conference, designer Tim Brown talks about the powerful relationship between creative thinking and play — with many examples you can try at home (and one that maybe you shouldn't).
  


 Psychology
The Psychology of Your Future Self (6:49)                                                                        01/25/2017
"Human beings are works in progress that mistakenly think they're finished." Dan Gilbert shares recent research on a phenomenon he calls the "end of history illusion," where we somehow imagine that the person we are right now is the person we'll be for the rest of time. Hint: that's not the case.



Public Good
Science in service to the public good (14:33)                                                                 05/01/2017
We give scientists and engineers great technical training, but we're not as good at teaching ethical decision-making or building character. Take, for example, the environmental crisis that recently unfolded in Flint, Michigan — and the professionals there who did nothing to fix it. Siddhartha Roy helped prove that Flint's water was contaminated, and he tells a story of science in service to the public good, calling on the next generation of scientists and engineers to dedicate their work to protecting people and the planet.



Public Speaking Package
A 2 hour collection of 9 TED Videos packaged to help you with public speaking which can include Interviews.  Whether in the public, small setting or private sessions, strong verbal communication skills will set you apart from the herd.

How to Speak so that People Want to Listen (9:58)



Purpose
Be an Opportunity Maker (9:46)
We all want to use our talents to create something meaningful with our lives.  But how to get started? (And ... what if you're shy?)  Writer Kare Anderson shares her own story of chronic shyness, and how she opened up her world by helping other people use their own talents and passions.
 
Before I die I want to ... (6:02)
In her New Orleans neighborhood, artist and TED Fellow Candy Chang turned an abandoned house into a giant chalkboard asking a fill-in-the-blank question: "Before I die I want to ___." Her neighbors' answers — surprising, poignant, funny — became an unexpected mirror for the community. (What's your answer?)

How NOT to be Ignorant About the World 
(19:05)                                                       2016/09/18
How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.
 
How to find work you love (6:20)
Scott Dinsmore quit a job that made him miserable, and spent the next four years wondering how to find work that was joyful and meaningful.  He shares what he learned in this deceptively simple talk about finding out what matters to you — and then getting started doing it.
 
How to Know Your Life Purpose in 5 minutes (10:32)
Adam Leipzig has overseen more than 25 movies as a producer, executive and distributor. and has produced more than 300 stage plays and live events, and he was one of the founders of the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
 
Living beyond Limits (9:44)
When she was 19, Amy Purdy lost both her legs below the knee.  And now ... she's a pro snowboarder (and a killer competitor on "Dancing with the Stars"!).  In this powerful talk, she shows us how to draw inspiration from life's obstacles.
 
Should you live for your resume ... or your eulogy? (5:01)
Within each of us are two selves, suggests David Brooks in this meditative short talk: the self who craves success, who builds a résumé, and the self who seeks connection, community, love — the values that make for a great eulogy.  (Joseph Soloveitchik has called these selves "Adam I" and "Adam II.")  Brooks asks: Can we balance these two selves?
 
Why some of Us Don't Have One True Calling (12:26)
What do you want to be when you grow up?  Well, if you're not sure you want to do just one thing for the rest of your life, you're not alone.  In this illuminating talk, writer and artist Emilie Wapnick describes the kind of people she calls "multipotentialites" — who have a range of interests and jobs over one lifetime.  Are you one?
 
Why you will fail to have a good career (15:08)  [LANGUAGE]
In this funny and blunt talk, Larry Smith pulls no punches when he calls out the absurd excuses people invent when they fail to pursue their passions.
 
 
Reality
What reality are you creating for yourself? (11:46)                                                     2016/10/08
Reality isn't something you perceive; it's something you create in your mind. Isaac Lidsky learned this profound lesson firsthand, when unexpected life circumstances yielded valuable insights. In this introspective, personal talk, he challenges us to let go of excuses, assumptions and fears, and accept the awesome responsibility of being the creators of our own reality. 


Reputation

       The Currency of the New Economy is Trust (19:39)    Good Lesson 
There's been an explosion of collaborative consumption — web-powered sharing of cars, apartments, skills.  Rachel Botsman explores the currency that makes systems like Airbnb and Taskrabbit work: trust, influence, and what she calls "reputation capital."     
 

Saving
Saving For Tomorrow, Tomorrow (17:45)                                                                          2016/10/09
It's easy to imagine saving money next week, but how about right now? Generally, we want to spend it. Economist Shlomo Benartzi says this is one of the biggest obstacles to saving enough for retirement, and asks: How do we turn this behavioral challenge into a behavioral solution?


Sex
        A little-told tale of sex and sensuality (16:10)                                                            06/00/2013   
          “If you really want to know a people, start by looking inside their bedrooms," says Shereen El
          Feki, who traveled through the Middle East for five years, talking to people about sex. While
          those conversations reflected rigid norms and deep repression, El Feki also discovered that
          sexual conservatism in the Arab world is a relatively new thing. She wonders: could a re-
          emergence of public dialogue lead to more satisfying, and safer, sex lives?


Stress
How to Stay Calm when You Know You'll be Stressed (12:20)                       2016/12/20
You're not at your best when you're stressed. In fact, your brain has evolved over millennia to release cortisol in stressful situations, inhibiting rational, logical thinking but potentially helping you survive, say, being attacked by a lion. Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin thinks there's a way to avoid making critical mistakes in stressful situations, when your thinking becomes clouded — the pre-mortem. "We all are going to fail now and then," he says. "The idea is to think ahead to what those failures might be."


Success

8 Secrets of Success (3:03)
Why do people succeed?  Is it because they're smart?  Or are they just lucky?  Neither.  Analyst Richard St. John condenses years of interviews into an unmissable 3-minute slideshow on the real secrets to success.
 
A Kinder, Gentler Philosophy of Success (16:51)
Alain de Botton examines our ideas of success and failure — and questions the assumptions underlying these two judgments.  Is success always earned?  Is failure?  He makes an eloquent, witty case to move beyond snobbery to find true pleasure in our work.
 
Carrie Green started her first online business at the age of 20, whilst studying Law at the University of Birmingham. Within a few years she took the business global, selling throughout the UK, USA, Canada, Australia and Europe and receiving over 100,000 hits on the website every month. In 2011 Carrie launched the Female Entrepreneur Association as a way to help inspire and connect female entrepreneurs from around the world. The network has grown to over 140,000 women and they now produce a digital magazine, This Girl Means Business, weekly videos, free online classes and more.

Success, Failure and the Drive to Keep Creating (7:18)
Elizabeth Gilbert was once an "unpublished diner waitress," devastated by rejection letters. And yet, in the wake of the success of 'Eat, Pray, Love,' she found herself identifying strongly with her former self. With beautiful insight, Gilbert reflects on why success can be as disorienting as failure and offers a simple — though hard — way to carry on, regardless of outcomes.

The Unexpected Benefit of Celebrating Failure (15:32)                                          2016/09/13
"Great dreams aren't just visions," says Astro Teller, "They're visions coupled to strategies for making them real." The head of X (formerly Google X), Teller takes us inside the "moonshot factory," as it's called, where his team seeks to solve the world's biggest problems through experimental projects like balloon-powered Internet and wind turbines that sail through the air. Find out X's secret to creating an organization where people feel comfortable working on big, risky projects and exploring audacious ideas.

 
Talking
6 Speaking Tips for Scientists and Engineers (Text)

How Great Leaders Inspire Action (17:57)
Simon Sinek has a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership — starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?"  His examples include Apple, Martin Luther King, and the Wright brothers ...

How I Beat Stage Fright (7:59)
Humanity's fine-tuned sense of fear served us well as a young species, giving us laser focus to avoid being eaten by competing beasts.  But it's less wonderful when that same visceral, body-hijacking sense of fear kicks in in front of 20 folk-music fans at a Tuesday night open-mic.  Palms sweat, hands shake, vision blurs, and the brain says RUN: it's stage fright. In this charming, tuneful little talk, Joe Kowan talks about how he conquered it.

How to Speak so that People Want to Listen (9:58)
Have you ever felt like you're talking, but nobody is listening?  Here's Julian Treasure to help.  In this useful talk, the sound expert demonstrates the how-to's of powerful speaking - from some handy vocal exercises to tips on how to speak with empathy.  A talk that might help the world sound more beautiful.
  
In a brilliantly tongue-in-cheek analysis, Sebastian Wernicke turns the tools of statistical analysis on TEDTalks, to come up with a metric for creating "the optimum TEDTalk" based on user ratings.  How do you rate it?  "Jaw-dropping"?  "Unconvincing"?  Or just plain "Funny"?

         Life Lessons from an Ad Man (16:32)
Advertising adds value to a product by changing our perception, rather than the product itself. Rory Sutherland makes the daring assertion that a change in perceived value can be just as satisfying as what we consider “real” value — and his conclusion has interesting consequences for how we look at life.
  
Shh!  Sound Health in 8 Steps (7:14)
Julian Treasure says our increasingly noisy world is gnawing away at our mental health — even costing lives. He lays out an 8-step plan to soften this sonic assault (starting with those cheap earbuds) and restore our relationship with sound.

Talk Nerdy To Me (12:58)
Melissa Marshall brings a message to all scientists (from non-scientists): We're fascinated by what you're doing. So tell us about it — in a way we can understand. In just 4 minutes, she shares powerful tips on presenting complex scientific ideas to a general audience.

TED's Secret to Great Public Speaking (7:55)                                                                  2016/10/19
There's no single formula for a great talk, but there is a secret ingredient that all the best ones have in common. TED Curator Chris Anderson shares this secret — along with four ways to make it work for you. Do you have what it takes to share an idea worth spreading?

The Danger of Silence (4:18)
"We spend so much time listening to the things people are saying that we rarely pay attention to the things they don't," says poet and teacher Clint Smith.  A short, powerful piece from the heart, about finding the courage to speak up against ignorance and injustice.        
 
The Lost Art of democratic Debate (19:42)                                                                        2016/10/06
Democracy thrives on civil debate, Michael Sandel says — but we're shamefully out of practice. He leads a fun refresher, with TEDsters sparring over a recent Supreme Court case (PGA Tour Inc. v. Martin) whose outcome reveals the critical ingredient in justice.

The Power of Vulnerability (20:19)
Brené Brown studies human connection — our ability to empathize, belong, love.  In a poignant, funny talk, she shares a deep insight from her research, one that sent her on a personal quest to know herself as well as to understand humanity.  A talk to share.

Why I live in Mortal Dread of Public Speaking (12:50)
Megan Washington is one of Australia's premier singer/songwriters.  And, since childhood, she has had a stutter.  In this bold and personal talk, she reveals how she copes with this speech impediment—from avoiding the letter combination “st” to tricking her brain by changing her words at the last minute to, yes, singing the things she has to say rather than speaking them.
  
  
Technology
4 Ways to Build a Human Company in the Age of Machines (11:14)            11/15/2016
In the face of artificial intelligence and machine learning, we need a new radical humanism, says Tim Leberecht.  For the self-described "business romantic," this means designing organizations and workplaces that celebrate authenticity instead of efficiency and questions instead of answers.  Leberecht proposes four (admittedly subjective) principles for building beautiful organizations.

The Incredible Inventions of Intuitive AI 
(15:23)                                                            02/06/2017
What do you get when you give a design tool a digital nervous system? Computers that improve our ability to think and imagine, and robotic systems that come up with (and build) radical new designs for bridges, cars, drones and much more — all by themselves. Take a tour of the Augmented Age with futurist Maurice Conti and preview a time when robots and humans will work side-by-side to accomplish things neither could do alone.

The Mystery Box The Incredible Inventions of Intuitive AI(18:02)                  10/16/2016
JJ Abrams traces his love for the unseen mystery –- a passion that’s evident in his films and TV shows, including Lost, Star Trek and the upcoming Star Wars VII — back to its magical beginnings.

The Next Step in Nanotechnology (9:35)                                                                            01/11/2017
Every year the silicon computer chip shrinks in size by half and doubles in power, enabling our devices to become more mobile and accessible.  But what happens when our chips can't get any smaller?  George Tulevski researches the unseen and untapped world of nanomaterials.  His current work: developing chemical processes to compel billions of carbon nanotubes to assemble themselves into the patterns needed to build circuits, much the same way natural organisms build intricate, diverse and elegant structures. Could they hold the secret to the next generation of computing?

Technology hasn't changed love. Here's why
 (19:05)                                                09/30/2016
In our tech-driven, interconnected world, we've developed new ways and rules to court each other, but the fundamental principles of love have stayed the same, says anthropologist Helen Fisher.   In this energetic tell-all from the front lines of love, learn how our faster connections are actually leading to slower, more intimate relationships.  Watch to the end for a lively discussion with love expert Esther Perel.


Time
How to Gain Control of Your Free Time (11:54)                                                            12/20/2016
There are 168 hours in each week.  How do we find time for what matters most?  Time management expert Laura Vanderkam studies how busy people spend their lives, and she's discovered that many of us drastically overestimate our commitments each week, while underestimating the time we have to ourselves.  She offers a few practical strategies to help find more time for what matters to us, so we can "build the lives we want in the time we've got."

The Psychology of Time (6:34)                                                                                                    01/25/2017
Psychologist Philip Zimbardo says happiness and success are rooted in a trait most of us disregard: the way we orient toward the past, present and future. He suggests we calibrate our outlook on time as a first step to improving our lives.



True Calling
Why Some of us Don't have One True Calling (12:26)                                              11/01/2016
What do you want to be when you grow up?  Well, if you're not sure you want to do just one thing for the rest of your life, you're not alone.  In this illuminating talk, writer and artiest Emilie Wapnick describes the kind of people she calls "mulipotentialites" -- who have a range of interests and jobs over one lifetime.  Are you one?



TRUST
The Currency of the New Economy is Trust (19:49)                                                   10/16/2016
There's been an explosion of collaborative consumption — web-powered sharing of cars, apartments, skills.  Rachel Botsman explores the currency that makes systems like Airbnb and Taskrabbit work: trust, influence, and what she calls "reputation capital."

We've Stopped Trusting Instutions and Started Trusting Strangers (17:08)
Something profound is changing our concept of trust, says 
Rachel Botsman.  While we used to place our trust in institutions like governments and banks, today we increasingly rely on others, often strangers, on platforms like Airbnb and Uber and through technologies like the blockchain.  This new era of trust could bring with it a more transparent, inclusive and accountable society — if we get it right.  Who do you trust?


Wisdom
       Wisdom from Great Writers on Every Year of Life (6:01)                                      01/25/2017
          As different as we humans are from one another, we all age along the same great sequence,
          and the shared patterns of our lives pass into the pages of the books we love. In this moving
          talk, journalist Joshua Prager explores the stages of life through quotations from Norman
          Mailer, Joyce Carol Oates, William Trevor and other great writers, set to visualizations by
          graphic designer Milton Glaser. "Books tell us who we've been, who we are, who we will be,
          too," Prager says.


Women
Women Entrepreneurs, Example Not Exception (13:16)
Women aren’t micro—so why do they only get micro-loans?  Reporter Gayle Tzemach Lemmon argues that women running all types of firms— from home businesses to major factories— are the overlooked key to economic development.
 
 
Work
Why do people feel so miserable and disengaged at work?  Because today's businesses are increasingly and dizzyingly complex — and traditional pillars of management are obsolete, says Yves Morieux.  So, he says, it falls to individual employees to navigate the rabbit's warren of inter-dependencies.  In this energetic talk, Morieux offers six rules for "smart simplicity." (Rule One: Understand what your colleagues actually do.)

How to Make the Work-Life Balance Work (10:05)                                                     12/30/2016
Work-life balance, says Nigel Marsh, is too important to be left in the hands of your employer. Marsh lays out an ideal day balanced between family time, personal time and productivity — and offers some stirring encouragement to make it happen. 

        The Future of Work 
(17:14)
In his talk at TEDxKoeln Heiko Fischer builds a strong case for turning Human Resources on its head by enabling employees to become resourceful humans instead.

The Happy Secret to Better Work (12:20)
We believe we should work hard in order to be happy, but could we be thinking about things backwards?  I this fast-moving and very funny talk, psychologist Shawn Achor argues that, actually, happiness inspires us to be more productive.

Economic growth has been slowing for the past 50 years, but relief might come from an unexpected place — a new form of manufacturing that is neither what you thought it was nor where you thought it was. Industrial systems thinker Olivier Scalabre details how a fourth manufacturing revolution will produce a macroeconomic shift and boost employment, productivity and growth.

What Makes us Feel Good about Our Work (20:26)
What motivates us to work?  Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money.  But it's not exactly joy either.  It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose.  Behavioral economist Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes toward meaning in our work.

Your Elusive Creative Genius (19:09)
Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses - and shares the radical idea that, instead of the rare person "being" a genius, all of us "have" a genius.  It's a funny, personal and surprisingly moving talk.


Worth
Know your worth, and then ask for it (8:22)                                                                   04/03/2017
Your boss probably isn't paying you what you're worth — instead, they're paying you what they think you're worth. Take the time to learn how to shape their thinking. Pricing consultant Casey Brown shares helpful stories and learnings that can help you better communicate your value and get paid for your excellence.