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Company Research

Updated 05/07/2017







    Walking into an interview without having done research into that company is a waste
   of your time, gas money and leaves them wanting to potentially black list you.

   Are we on the same page now?

  1.  Culture & Fit
     More people resign because of a conflict with the Company Culture or their Manager.  To get this
     level of information you need to talk to people working there that YOU KNOW.  Ask them pointed
     questions like what does this company believe in, what charitable activities do they have and what
     is the involvement of the employees (if any), how do they treat the employees?  How are the
     managers?

  2.  Visit their Website
     -  Company History
         What has this company done over the years.  Are they growing and if so where?  Are they
         offering new products or services - these are the lifeblood of many companies.

     -  Mission Statement
         Many companies DO NOT have a mission statement; those that do is encouraging but they may
         not attempt to live up to it.

     -  Good and Services
         What is the company offering to their customers and prospects?  Are these in "final phases" of
         life expectancy or are these in demand goods and services that companies need to be and
         remain competitive in their field.

     -  Management
         Are these guys and gals coming up through the ranks or from various areas inside and outside
         of the company.  Internally grown executives can be a red flag of insuring stagnation and set
         policies.  Too many people from the outside suggests no one wants to rise to the upper levels.

     -  If publically held, request an Annual Report from their Website
         Pulling their 10-K report using EDGAR, a free easy to use tool at SEC.gov can provide incredible
         insight into the company including statements of direction and planned moves.  The benefit of
         a 10-K is this is a report to the Federal Government where they MUST tell the truth.  Annual
         reports are sometimes more of a marketing document filled with wishful expectations.

     -  Linkedin
         Look at the people who work here in areas your interested in and connect with them for inside
         information on culture, practices, working conditions, etc.  Look at information on new hires
         and where they came from and went to college.  Some industries will not promote a person to
         an executive position unless they graduated from a certain college or university.  What jobs
         are they posting.  How to their statistics compare to comparable companies?  Look at the
         profiles for Recruiters and see their background and try to connect with some.

     -  Glassdoor.com
         A great section where people can post their salary and job title by city and state.  A great tool to
         determine where their offer may come in at compared to your experience.  This information is
         entered as an anonymous user to protect those who provide information.  A section of interview
         questions and practices is also available.  Remember these may be dated but it at least provides
         insight into what they have done before.

     -  ??
         
Use Social Media
    Check Facebook, Google+ and Twitter. Like or follow the company to get updates. You'll find information you may not have found otherwise.

        Google and Google News
          Search both Google and Google News for the company name.


                Tap Your Connections
                  If you have a connection that will help you find inside information, use it. Do you know someone who works there? Ask them if they can help. If you're a college grad ask your Career Office if they can give you a list of alumni who work there. Then email, send a LinkedIn message or call and ask for assistance.

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