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Dream Job

Updated 09/10/2016


   The Dream Job.  It is real, a big mix of 
   our wildest dreams or only a fantasy?

   A Dream Job exists somewhere between
   knowing exactly, in all aspects, what the
   job would be and a substantial salary
   for this position to the realization that
   it is just a wild fantasy and that bills
   must be paid.

   Your challenge with focus and clarity of
   the dream job creates confusion.  Before
   you can create the plan the definitions
   for what you see it as being and where
   you seeing it exist must be defined to
   create the critical component ... how.  

   
   DEFINING THE DREAM 
 
A critical part of any initiative, undertaking, project or other activity is to have a
written description of the end objective whether it is to achieve great fame, vast
wealth, extensive knowledge or to leverage one or more passions into a career.
You need to be able to define what your end objective will look like, consist of,
perhaps feel, taste or look like, and how it will impact or benefit you or others.

Many still struggle with this because there is no clear simple path to your goal.
Welcome to the cold cruel word of reality.  So if you REALLY want to follow you
passions you will have to invest some brain power (and not necessarily all of
yours), some deep personal introspectives on what you really are looking for,
and what can put together into something people, private organizations or
companies, charitable groups, special interest groups or governments would
pay to see happen.  Yelling in the streets you want to be American's next multi-
Billionaire will not draw the attention of the local media but it may get a net dropped over your head.  Fortunately the Internet can connect with to many
web sites to help you define your dream job and of course you will also need to define your Personal Brand as you can't have a Dream Job without a solid Brand.

 FRAMING YOUR DREAM JOB 

Several thoughts run through the minds of people for their dream job:
  •  I want more money.
  •  I want respect from those working with me.
  •  I want a job close to home for a short drive.
  •  I want recognition for being nice to others.
  •  I want formal recognition with awards for my work.
  •  I want to be at a large company where I could travel to places.
  •  I want significant promotions on a regular basis.
  •  I want stock options and tax free stock grants.
  •  I want to be the highest paid person in the department.
  •  I want a big office with a personal staff and secretaries.
  •  I want want reserved parking places for my friends.
  •  I want a 24x7 limo and drive for anywhere I want to go.
  •  I want an unlimited clothing allowance
  •  I want on-call medical care 24x7 for anything I say I need
  •  I want to be empowered to make decisions free of any criticism
  •  I want a Boeing 787 as my personal aircraft at company expense
  •  I want a full flight staff including fully stocked galley and bar
  •  I want a full entertainment center including global communications
  •  I want ground support services while traveling and all accommodations
  •  I want not to have to do much in this new position with no accountability
Then, hopefully, reality comes into play and you get serious about reality:
  •  Should this be the multi-conglomerate corporation with over one
     million people globally?  Should it be under 10 people for greater ease
     in managing people?  Should it be US only or are you looking for a job
     that has multi-national operations?  Or something of a combination?

     Larger companies offer more positions but draw more competition as
     companies draw from global workforces and often are more complex
     to manage due to size and adapting quickly to changes in business
     factors.  Multi-nationals bring excitement but also involved regulatory
     actions that must be addressed and receive government approvals.

  •  Company Culture is the #1 reason why people resign.  Not being able
     to fit in or not wanting to fit in can result in your resignation.  Many
     factors are part of the culture locally and at the corporate level.

  •  The Work Style is something to consider.  Is this company closer to an 
     elite Seals or Marine Strike Force or closer to something more focused
     on long term achievement?  Is this an environment you can do well in?

  •  Financial Stability is always a factor as companies will terminate in any
     number of ways to cut bottom line costs.  A few lost business deals or
     shift in your industry could turn smiling faces quickly.  Shifts in the
     securities markets could create unforeseen financial challenges as the
     stock may widely fluctuate or company face currency exchange issues.

    STILL IN INITIAL ROUGH DRAFT PHASE


 




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