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Emotional Intelligence

Updated 03/09/2017

  Emotional intelligence (EI) or emotional
  quotient
 (EQ) is the capability of
  individuals to recognize their own, and
  other people's emotions, to discriminate
  between different feelings and label them
  appropriately, to use emotional
  information to guide thinking and
  behavior, and to manage and/or adjust
  emotions to adapt environments or
  achieve one's goal(s).  Some dispute it, some advocate it.  
Consider it for yourself.

  Studies have shown that people with high EI have greater mental health, job
  performance, and leadership skills although no causal relationships have been shown
  and such findings are likely to be attributable to general intelligence and specific
  personality traits rather than emotional intelligence as a construct. For example,
  Goleman indicated that EI accounted for 67% of the abilities deemed necessary for
  superior performance in leaders, and mattered twice as much as technical expertise or
  IQ.  Other research finds that the effect of EI on leadership and managerial
  performance is non-significant when ability and personality are controlled for,[6] and
  that general intelligence correlates very closely with leadership.[7] Markers of EI and
  methods of developing it have become more widely coveted in the past decade. In
  addition, studies have begun to provide evidence to help characterize the neural
  mechanisms of emotional intelligence.


  
Criticisms have centered on whether EI is a real intelligence and whether it has
  incremental validity over IQ and the Big Five personality traits.[11] Review finds that, in
  most studies, poor research methodology has exaggerated the significance of EI.
                                                                       Source: Wikipedia.com at Emotional intelligence

   12 Habits of Genuine People                                             All graphics enlarge if clicked on.     
   7 Ways You Can Unlock
   Your Hidden Emotional Intelligence

  1. Be emotionally aware.
  2. Hold yourself accountable.
  3. Be confident in yourself and team
  4. Bring your empathy
  5. Be a motivator
  6. Create a safe zone
  7. Treat people with respect


     1. You get stressed easily. 
     
2. You have difficulty asserting yourself
     
3. You have a limited emotional vocabulary
     
4. You make assumptions quickly and defend them vehemently
   
  5. You hold grudges
     
6. You don't let go of mistakes
     7. You often feel misunderstood
     8. You don't know your triggers
     
9. You don't get angry
   
10. You blame other people for how they make you feel
   
11. You're easily offended





   Emotional Intelligence Test (free or paid)
    Like other forms of intelligence, your emotional IQ is not a static
    trait. By learning your weaknesses and building upon your
    strengths, you can work toward greater emotional intelligence.
    Especially for people with low emotional intelligence, it can be
    challenging to know what areas need improvement, and this test
    provides you with a completely private opportunity to learn about
    traits you might want to work on. It can be painful to examine your
    social weaknesses, especially because many people have been
    bullied or mistreated for lacking certain social skills. Nevertheless,
    by answering questions honestly, you may be able to learn more
    about your strengths and weaknesses. If you are not sure about the
    answer to a question on this test, think about your previous social interactions
    or ask a friend or family member what they think. Oftentimes it is easier to
    think about our social behavior when we put it in a specific context.

    GoodTherapy.org has partnered with PsychTests AIM Inc. as the assessment provider
    for this test. The test is scored like a standard intelligence test, where 100 is average.
    You will also be given a percentile rank to help you understand where you stand in
    comparison to others. The test contains 146 questions and on average takes 45
    minutes to complete.
You will get a snapshot report of where you fall relative to other
    people, and will also have the option to purchase a more detailed full report. The paid
    report details your rank within numerous dimensions of emotional intelligence including
    emotional awareness, impulse control, empathy, conflict management, motivation,
    maturity, and self-esteem. The full test report is optional and can be purchased for
    $9.95 after you complete the test.
              Test for Emotional Intelligence  

 

   Are You Emotionally Intelligent?
    When emotional intelligence (EQ) first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing
    link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs
    70 percent of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into the broadly held
    assumption that IQ was the sole source of success.
Decades of research now point to
    emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that sets star performers apart from
    the rest of the pack. The connection is so strong that 90 percent of top performers have
    high emotional intelligence.
Emotional intelligence is the "something" in each of us that
    is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior
navigates social complexities, and
    make personal decisions to achieve positive results.

 


     Exceptional Employees have Emotional Intelligence  | Linkedin, Dr. Ray Bradberry              05/08/2017
    A recent international study surveyed more than 500 business leaders and asked them what
    sets great employees apart. The researchers wanted to know why some people are more
    successful than others at work, and the answers were surprising; leaders chose “personality”
    as the leading reason.
Notably, 78% of leaders said personality sets great employees apart,
    more than cultural fit (53%) and even an employee’s skills (39%).
            
We should take care not to make the intellect our God; it has, of course,
             powerful muscles, but no personality.
”   – Albert Einstein

\
   Here's How to Know for Sure
     
   The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence
   
In some jobs, being in touch with emotions is essential. In others, it seems to be a
    detriment. And like any skill, being able to read people can be used for good or evil.

 
   Is Your Emotional Intelligence High or Low?  Here Are 10 Ways to Find Out
   
One of my favorite topics to write about is emotional intelligence in leaders. I say this
    because a culture of high leadership EQ will produce dramatic results.
On the flip side,
    low leadership EQ can be toxic and lead to a lot of drama that will disengage workers
    and put a monkey wrench in your productivity.  
Let's take a look at both sides of the EQ coin. 


   Leadership and Emotional Intelligence. Is there even a connection? Let’s find out.
    Leaders make wonderful things really happen. They have a vision of what and also
    how. Leadership is not only just about the bottom line, but
how you reach that line and
    impact of that journey on your people. The best leaders know it all comes down to the
    people eventually.  
Leaders are also often more likable than Managers. Managers
    manage people. Managing a team is an outdated concept which inspires no one.
    Developing your people can not be outsourced to L&D department, while you focus on
    business. Rather it is Leader’s business to develop her/his team.


    Why your boss lacks emotional intelligence  |  Ladders, Travis Bradberry                                     08/24/2017
    Over the past century, the heartless, no-nonsense CEO has become something of an
    icon — and a cliché — in American society. Hollywood would have us believe that the
    Machiavellian chief exec is still alive and well.
    But that’s just TV, right? How about in the real world? Do businesses still allow these
    inhumane relics to survive?

    
To find out, TalentSmart analyzed the emotional intelligence (EQ) profiles of the
    million-plus people in our database — workers from the frontlines to the C-suite. We
    discovered that the answer is yes, organizations today do promote the emotionally inept
    . . . except when they don’t. Allow me to explain.

 
   10 Powerful Ways To Create Your Own Happiness  |  Linkedin, Dr. Travis Bradberry               08/21/2016
    Happiness comes in so many different forms that it can be hard to grasp. Unhappiness,
    on the other hand, is easy to identify; you know it when you see it, and you definitely
    know when it’s taken ahold of you.  
And let’s face it, happiness and work do not always
    go hand in hand. A 2013 Gallup study, which reported data from more than 180 million
    people, found that just 13% of us consider ourselves to be “happily engaged at work.”
    Those who do rate themselves as happy are 36% more motivated, six times more
    energized, and twice as productive as their unhappy counterparts.

 
   13 Things That Will Make You Much Happier  |  Inc., Dr. Travis Bradberry
    It's no secret that we're obsessed with happiness. After all, the "pursuit of happiness" is
    even enshrined in the Declaration of Independence. But happiness is fleeting. How can
    we find it and keep it alive?  Psychologists at the University of California have discovered
    some fascinating things about happiness that could change your life.


     15 Signs You are Emotionally Intelligent  |  Linkedin, Dr. Travis Bradberry                                       03/20/2017
    When emotional intelligence (EQ) first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing
    link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs
    70% of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into the broadly held assumption
    that IQ was the sole source of success.
    Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that
    sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. The connection is so strong that 90%
    of top performers have high emotional intelligence.