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Emotions

Updated 08/04/2017
e·mo·tion
əˈmōSH(ə)n/
noun
plural noun: emotions
  1. a natural instinctive state of mind deriving from one's circumstances, mood, or relationships with others.
    "she was attempting to control her emotions"
    synonyms:feelingsentimentMore
    • instinctive or intuitive feeling as distinguished from reasoning or knowledge.
      "responses have to be based on historical insight, not simply on emotion"
      synonyms:instinctintuition, gut feeling; 
      sentiment, the heart
      "responses based purely on emotion"



5 Ways to Kill Your Dreams (6:11)                                                                                                        10/22/2016
All of us want to invent that game-changing product, launch that successful
company, write that best-selling book.  And yet so few of us actually do it.  
TED Fellow and Brazilian entrepreneur
 Bel Pesce breaks down five
easy-to-believe myths that ensure your dream projects will never come to
fruition.


8 Secrets of Success (3:30) [LANGUAGE]
Why do people succeed?  Is it because they're smart?  Or are they just lucky?
Neither. Analyst 
Richard St. John condenses years of interviews into an
unmissable 3-minute slideshow on the real secrets of success.
 
 
A Better Way to Talk About Love (15:17)                                                                                            01/11/2017
In love, we fall. We're struck, we're crushed, we swoon.  We burn with passion.
Love makes us crazy and makes us sick.  Our hearts ache, and then they break.
Talking about love in this way fundamentally shapes how we experience it, says
writer
 Mandy Len Catron.  In this talk for anyone who's ever felt crazy in love,
Catron highlights a different metaphor for love that may help us find more joy
— and less suffering — in it.


Dare to Disagree (12:48) 
Most people instinctively avoid conflict, but as Margaret Heffernan shows us,
good disagreement is central to progress.  She illustrates (sometimes
counter-intuitively) how the best partners aren’t echo chambers — and how great
research teams, relationships and businesses allow people to deeply disagree.
      
"The opposite of depression is not happiness, but vitality, and it was vitality that
seemed to seep away from me in that moment."  In a talk equal parts eloquent
and devastating, writer 
Andrew Solomon takes you to the darkest corners of his
mind during the years he battled depression. That led him to an eye-opening
journey across the world to interview others with depression — only to discover
that, to his surprise, the more he talked, the more people wanted to tell their own
stories.



How Frustration can Make Us More Creative (15:32)                                              09/24/2016
Challenges and problems can derail your creative process ... or they can make
you more creative than ever. In the surprising story behind the best-selling solo
piano album of all time, 
Tim Harford may just convince you of the advantages
of having to work with a little mess.

 

Falling in Love is the Easy Part
 
(13:53)                                                                          10/22/2016
Did you know you can fall in love with anyone just by asking them 36 questions?  
Mandy Len Catron tried this experiment, it worked, and she wrote a viral article
about it (that your mom probably sent you). But … is that real love? Did it last?
And what’s the difference between falling in love and staying in love?


Personal Tales from the Edge (15:46)                                 
For many years Sergeant Kevin Briggs had a dark, unusual, at times strangely
rewarding job: He patrolled the southern end of San Francisco’s Golden Gate
Bridge, a popular site for suicide attempts. In a sobering, deeply personal talk
Briggs shares stories from those he’s spoken — and listened — to standing on
the edge of life. 
He gives a powerful piece of advice to those with loved ones
who might be contemplating suicide.



The Agony of Trying to Unsubscribe (7:40)
It happens to all of us: you unsubscribe from an unwanted marketing email, and
a few days later another message from the same company pops up in your inbox.  
Comedian 
James Veitch turned this frustration into whimsy when a local supermarket
refused to take no for an answer. Hijinks ensued.

  

You're Already Awesome. Just Get Out of Your Own Way! (10:20)
We have all experienced moments in our lives where everything just comes together
in some almost magical way --whether playing music, participating in a sport, or just
getting totally absorbed in a project. These moments are timeless, effortless,
completely free of worry and delicious! As described by 
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
this is "flow" and is often a hallmark of exemplary performance --whether it is Michael
Jordan scoring 50 points in a basketball game, or someone rising to a challenge that
they never thought they would be able to handle.


We're lucky if we get into this "flow state" a few times in our entire lives. Is this flow
state that hard to achieve? Is it more accessible to all of us than we think? And are we
the only barrier that is keeping us getting into flow?


Judson Brewer MD PhD, an addiction psychiatrist and neuroscientist at Yale University
outlines several common ways that we get in our own way. Using examples such as Lolo
Jones tripping on a hurdle in the 2008 Beijing Olympics and smokers resisting their
cravings, he describes how we can get caught up in thinking, as well as resisting our
own body sensations as ways that we prevent ourselves from performing optimally, in
whatever situation arises. 


He details how his clinical research has found that techniques that help us get out of
our own way, such as mindfulness training, can have large effects; for example, in a
randomized controlled clinical trial for smoking cessation performed at the Yale
University School of Medicine, Dr. Brewer's laboratory found that mindfulness training
showed twice quit rates compared to the American Lung Association's Freedom From
Smoking program. 


He also describes the brain processes behind getting in our own way, which involve a
network of brain regions dubbed the "default mode network" because of how often it
gets activated --for example, when we are regretting something we did in the past or
worry about something in the future. Importantly, he details some of the neuroimaging
research his laboratory at Yale University has performed using experienced meditators,
and how he found that a key region of the default mode network, the posterior cingulate
cortex, gets deactivated during meditation. This work suggests that the posterior
cingulate cortex may be a key brain marker for both getting in our own way and stepping
out. 


He finishes by listing some simple ways that we can pay attention so we can get out of
our own way in our everyday lives. He also unveils a new fMRI neurofeedback tool that
can track and potentially augment training of this elusive flow state. 



Getting Stuck in the Negatives (and how to get out of them) (8:22)
Alison Ledgerwood joined the Department of Psychology at UC Davis in 2008 after
completing her PhD in social psychology at New York University. She is interested in
understanding how people think, and how they can think better. Her research, which
is funded by the National Science Foundation, investigates how certain ways of thinking
about an issue tend to stick in people's heads. Her classes on social psychology focus
on understanding the way people think and behave in social situations, and how to
harness that knowledge to potentially improve the social world in which we all live.



How Frustration can make us more creative
 (15:32)
Challenges and problems can derail your creative process ... or they can make you
more creative than ever. In the surprising story behind the best-selling solo piano
album of all time, 
Tim Harford may just convince you of the advantages of having to
work with a little mess.



How to Make Stress Your Friend
 (14:25)
Stress. It makes your heart pound, your breathing quicken and your forehead sweat.  
But while stress has been made into a public health enemy, new research suggests
that stress may only be bad for you if you believe that to be the case. Psychologist 
Kelly McGonigal urges us to see stress as a positive, and introduces us to an unsung
mechanism for stress reduction: reaching out to others.


How to Stay Calm when You Know You'll Be Stressed
 (12:20)
You're not at your best when you're stressed. In fact, your brain has evolved over
millennia to release cortisol in stressful situations, inhibiting rational, logical thinking
but potentially helping you survive, say, being attacked by a lion. Neuroscientist 
Daniel Levitin thinks there's a way to avoid making critical mistakes in stressful
situations, when your thinking becomes clouded — the pre-mortem. "We all are going
to fail now and then," he says. "The idea is to think ahead to what those failures might be."


 

On Bring Wrong
 
(17:51)
Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong. But what if we're wrong about
that? "Wrongologist" 
Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting
but embracing our fallibility.


Optimism Bias (17:33)
Are we born to be optimistic, rather than realistic? Tali Sharot shares new research
that suggests our brains are wired to look on the bright side — and how that can be
both dangerous and beneficial.


  
Strange Answers to the Psychopath Test (18:01)
Is there a definitive line that divides crazy from sane? With a hair-raising delivery,
Jon Ronson, author of The Psychopath Test, illuminates the gray areas between the
two.  (With live-mixed sound by 
Julian Treasure and animation by Evan Grant.)

 
The Agony of Trying to Unsubscribe (7:40) [Comedy]
It happens to all of us: you unsubscribe from an unwanted marketing email, and a
few days later another message from the same company pops up in your inbox.
Comedian
 James Veitch turned this frustration into whimsy when a local supermarket
refused to take no for an answer. Hijinks ensued.

 
The Price of Happiness (14:40)
Can happiness be bought? To find out, author Benjamin Wallace sampled the world's
most expensive products, including a bottle of 1947 Chateau Cheval Blanc, 8 ounces
of Kobe beef and the fabled (notorious) Kopi Luwak coffee. His critique may surprise
you.
 

Why we all need to practice Emotional First Aid (17:24)                                                    11/00/2014
We'll go to the doctor when we feel flu-ish or a nagging pain. So why don’t we see
a health professional when we feel emotional pain: guilt, loss, loneliness? Too many
of us deal with common psychological-health issues on our own, says 
Guy Winch
But we don’t have to. He makes a compelling case to practice emotional hygiene —
taking care of our emotions, our minds, with the same diligence we take care of our
bodies.


Why we do what we do (21:45) [LANGUAGE]
Tony Robbins discusses the "invisible forces" that motivate everyone's actions.

  
What Makes us Feel Good about Our Work (20:26)
What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money.  But
it's not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress
and feeling a sense of purpose. Behavioral economist 
Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes toward meaning in our
work.