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Magic

Updated 08/04/2017
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    Magic         






A Cyber Magic Card Trick Like No Other
 (6:35)                                                                      10/16/22016
The suits, numbers and colors in a deck of cards correspond to the seasons, moon
cycles and calendar.
  
Marco Tempest straps on augmented reality goggles and does
a card trick like you’ve never seen before, weaving a lyrical tale as he deals. (This
version fixes a glitch in the original performance, but is otherwise exactly as seen
live by the TEDGlobal audience, including the dazzling augmented reality effects.)
 
A Magical Tale with an Augmented Reality (6:31)                                                                                    10/16/2016
Marco Tempest spins a beautiful story of what magic is, how it entertains us and
how it highlights our humanity — all while working extraordinary illusions with his
hands and an augmented reality machine.
 
And For My Next Trick, A Robot (6:18)                                                                                            10/16/2016
Marco Tempest uses charming stagecraft to demo EDI, the multi-purpose robot
designed to work very closely with humans. Less a magic trick than an intricately
choreographed performance, Tempest shows off the robot’s sensing technology,
safety features and strength, and makes the case for a closer human-robot
relationship. (Okay, there’s a little magic, too.)
 
How Equal Do We Want the World To Be? You'd Be Surprised! (8:53)                    10/16/2016
The news of society's growing inequality makes all of us uneasy. But why?  
Dan Ariely reveals some new, surprising research on what we think is fair, as far
as how wealth is distributed over societies ... then shows how it stacks up to the
real stats.
 
What Makes Us Feel Good about Our Work? (20:26)                                                              10/16/2016
What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money.
But it's not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant
progress and feeling a sense of purpose. Behavioral economist
 
Dan Ariely presents
two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes
toward meaning in our work.







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