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Body Language, Leaders

Updated 07/17/2017
 
  WHAT IS YOU BODY
  SHOUTING OUT TO
  PEOPLE WHO COME
  TO TALK WITH YOU,
  THAT MANY NOT BE
    WHAT YOU SAY?


                                                                                                                                                     (Click to enlarge image)

          
    10 Body Language Tips to Power Up Your Career  |  Linkedin, Carol Kinsey Goman                   06/10/2017
    Body language can be your greatest career asset. Here are ten simple, but powerful tips
    to increase your professional impact with specifics for each Tip in the article.
 
         1.  To make a great first impression, begin before you enter the room.
         2.  To dramatically increase your professional impact, make eye contact like Goldilocks.
         3.  To boost your self-confidence, ditch your cell phone and buy a newspaper.
         4.  To build instant and lasting rapport, touch someone while saying "the magic word". 
         5.  To reduce resistance, don’t allow people to double-cross you. 
         6.  To power up your thinking, talk with your hands – but watch what they say.
         7.  To communicate more effectively, stop talking.
         8.  To raise your salary, lower your voice.
         9.  To sound more dynamic, widen your stance.
       10.  To reach your goals, get a grip.


    So You Work For A Bully - Or Just A Tough Boss?  |  Linkedin, Carol Kinsey Goman                   07-26-2017
    I met Brenda when she managed a 2,000-person department for a Fortune 500 company.
    Brought in to help her with an upcoming change initiative, I was impressed by Brenda’s
    intelligence, creativity, political savvy, and dedication to her job. She had most of the
    qualities of a senior executive – which was her career goal.
    But she was also a bully. One direct report described her as a “kiss-up and slap-down
    kind of manager.” The targets of the bullying were especially demoralized, but even those
    on her staff who only witnessed the bad behavior began to devote more energy to
    protecting themselves than they did to helping the company. Brenda's dysfunctional
    management style eventually led to a decline in her department’s performance and, as a
    result, the change initiative was abandoned. Eventually Brenda’s career was derailed by the
    increasing number of enemies she made with every nasty glare and mean-spirited remark.
    She resigned when it became obvious that she would never get the promotion she coveted.